Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am testing insert-select query and noticed an weird result.

CREATE TABLE `test` (
  `cnt` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `a` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
  `b` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`cnt`)
)

CREATE TABLE `test_current` (
  `a` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
  `b` int(11) DEFAULT NULL
)

First I created two tables, and insert some values into test_current

mysql> insert into test_current (a,b) values (1,1),(2,2);
Query OK, 2 rows affected (0.00 sec)
Records: 2  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0

And I did this query

mysql> INSERT INTO test (a,b) SELECT a,b FROM test_current;
Query OK, 2 rows affected, 1 warning (0.00 sec)
Records: 2  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 1

mysql> select * from test;
+-----+------+------+
| cnt | a    | b    |
+-----+------+------+
|   1 |    1 |    1 |
|   2 |    2 |    2 |
+-----+------+------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)

But when I did the query again

mysql> INSERT INTO test (a,b) SELECT a,b FROM test_current;
Query OK, 2 rows affected, 1 warning (0.00 sec)
Records: 2  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 1

mysql> select * from test;
+-----+------+------+
| cnt | a    | b    |
+-----+------+------+
|   1 |    1 |    1 |
|   2 |    2 |    2 |
|   4 |    1 |    1 |
|   5 |    2 |    2 |
+-----+------+------+

The auto increment just skipped cnt for 3. I want to know what is this about.

share|improve this question
1  
In the result, you see "2 rows affected, 1 warning". Perhaps the warning has something to do with it. (edit: tried it myself, same result, no warning, MySQL 5.5) –  Bart Friederichs Sep 1 '12 at 8:18
    
The warning was this | Note | 1592 | Unsafe statement written to the binary log using statement format since BINLOG_FORMAT = STATEMENT. Statements writing to a table with an auto-increment column after selecting from another table are unsafe because the order in which rows are retrieved determines what (if any) rows will be written. This order cannot be predicted and may differ on master and the slave. | –  user1640242 Sep 1 '12 at 8:22
    
OK, doesn't seem to have anything to do with it. –  Bart Friederichs Sep 1 '12 at 8:23
    
I turned off binary log and did it without error but it resulted same. –  user1640242 Sep 1 '12 at 8:26
1  
Looks like this bug: bugs.mysql.com/bug.php?id=61058 –  Barmar Sep 1 '12 at 8:39

3 Answers 3

Looks like this bug: bugs.mysql.com/bug.php?id=61058

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for this –  user1640242 Sep 1 '12 at 8:49
    
It was the first hit when I googled "mysql insert select auto increment bug" –  Barmar Sep 1 '12 at 8:53
    
Probably ignoring it because it's not that important. Most tables that use auto-increment eventually get gaps because of deleting records, so applications shouldn't depend on them being sequential. –  Barmar Sep 28 '14 at 1:32

You can reset the auto_increment value to 1 every time before inserting values into your table:

ALTER TABLE `test` AUTO_INCREMENT = 1;
INSERT INTO test (a,b) SELECT a,b FROM test_current;
share|improve this answer
    
That may be a solution, but why do you think the problem is occurring in the first place? –  Cupidvogel Sep 1 '12 at 8:39

Put in your My.cnf:

innodb_autoinc_lock_mode=0
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.