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Hi I'm trying to load a key from HKLM\\SYSTEM\\CurrentControlSet\\Services\\Fax but i'm getting error 5 (Access Denied). I'm not able to figure it out what is wrong with my code.

Here is my code

#include <windows.h>
#include <tchar.h>
#include <stdio.h>

BOOL SetPrivilege(
    HANDLE hToken,          // access token handle
    LPCTSTR lpszPrivilege,  // name of privilege to enable/disable
    BOOL bEnablePrivilege   // to enable or disable privilege
) 
{
    TOKEN_PRIVILEGES tp;
    LUID luid;

    if ( !LookupPrivilegeValue( 
        NULL,            // lookup privilege on local system
        lpszPrivilege,   // privilege to lookup 
        &luid ) )        // receives LUID of privilege
{
    printf("LookupPrivilegeValue error: %u\n", GetLastError() ); 
    return FALSE; 
}

tp.PrivilegeCount = 1;
tp.Privileges[0].Luid = luid;
if (bEnablePrivilege)
    tp.Privileges[0].Attributes = SE_PRIVILEGE_ENABLED;
else
    tp.Privileges[0].Attributes = 0;

// Enable the privilege or disable all privileges.

if ( !AdjustTokenPrivileges(
       hToken, 
       FALSE, 
       &tp, 
       sizeof(TOKEN_PRIVILEGES), 
       (PTOKEN_PRIVILEGES) NULL, 
       (PDWORD) NULL) )
{ 
      printf("AdjustTokenPrivileges error: %u\n", GetLastError() ); 
      return FALSE; 
} 

if (GetLastError() == ERROR_NOT_ALL_ASSIGNED)

{
      printf("The token does not have the specified privilege. \n");
      return FALSE;
} 

return TRUE;
}
void _tmain(int argc, TCHAR *argv[])
{

HKEY   hKey;
LONG   lErrorCode;
HANDLE ProcessToken;
LPCWSTR subkey =  L"SYSTEM\\CurrentControlSet\\Services\\Fax";


if (OpenProcessToken(GetCurrentProcess(), 
        TOKEN_ADJUST_PRIVILEGES | TOKEN_QUERY, &ProcessToken)) 
{

    SetPrivilege(ProcessToken, SE_BACKUP_NAME, TRUE);
    SetPrivilege(ProcessToken, SE_RESTORE_NAME, TRUE);
    SetPrivilege(ProcessToken, SE_RESTORE_NAME, TRUE);

}


lErrorCode = RegOpenKeyEx(HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE,subkey ,
                              0, KEY_ALL_ACCESS, &hKey);
if (lErrorCode != ERROR_SUCCESS)
   {
  _tprintf(TEXT("Error in RegOpenKeyEx (%d).\n"), lErrorCode);
  return;
   }
else
{
    _tprintf(TEXT("Key is successfully Opened\n"));
}

lErrorCode = RegSaveKey(hKey,L"c:\\load.reg",0);
if (lErrorCode != ERROR_SUCCESS)
   {
  _tprintf(TEXT("Error in RegSaveKey (%d).\n"), lErrorCode);
  return;
   }
else
{
    _tprintf(TEXT("Key is successfully Saved \n"));
}

lErrorCode = RegLoadKey(HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE,subkey,L"c:\\load.reg");
if (lErrorCode != ERROR_SUCCESS)
   {
  _tprintf(TEXT("Error in RegLoadKey (%d).\n"), lErrorCode);
  return;
   }
else
{
    _tprintf(TEXT("Key is successfully loaded \n"));
}

lErrorCode = RegCloseKey(hKey);
if (lErrorCode != ERROR_SUCCESS)
   {
  _tprintf(TEXT("Error in closing the key (%d).\n"), lErrorCode);
  return;
   }
else
{
    _tprintf(TEXT("Key is successfully closed \n"));
}
}

This is the output

Key is successfully Opened 
Key is successfully Saved 
Error in RegLoadKey (5).
share|improve this question
3  
Have you tried running the application as Administrator? Everything that wants to access HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE needs to run as administrator, else it fails. –  Alex Sep 1 '12 at 9:38
    
no i'm running my cmd as admin only... –  Hemant Sep 2 '12 at 19:13
    
I don't know what you mean by 'no'. If you haven't tried, you can right click the Command Prompt in Accessories and Run as Administrator, and then run the applciation. Another alternative is to programatically demand privilege escalation. In MFC, this can be done with a manifest. If you don't use MFC, you can do some research on how to do it strictly in code. –  Alex Sep 2 '12 at 19:30
1  
@Alex: the OP's code checks that the necessary privileges are successfully assigned, so it would be generating an explicit error message if it wasn't running in an elevated context. –  Harry Johnston Sep 4 '12 at 19:49

1 Answer 1

RegLoadKey can only be used to load a new hive into the registry. You can't use it to overwrite a subkey of an existing hive.

You probably want to use RegRestoreKey instead.

Additional:

To the best of my knowledge, hives can only be loaded at a registry root, i.e., they must be HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\foo or HKEY_USERS\foo, never HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\foo\bar. Also, I don't think you can load a hive with a name that already exists, e.g., you can't load a hive into HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE. Even if you could do these things, you'd be changing your view of the content, not merging it, and when the system was rebooted the original content would reappear. As previously mentioned, if you want to insert data into an existing hive, use RegRestoreKey rather than RegLoadKey.

You ask about the use cases for RegLoadKey: there aren't many. Mostly, it's used by the operating system; for example, that's how your personal hive is loaded into HKEY_USERS\username when you log in. There are some oddball cases, such as resetting a password offline or otherwise modifying the registry of another Windows instance. The process I use for the unattended installation of Windows on the computers in my teaching lab depends on modifying the registry of the Windows installation image to disable the keyboard and mouse.

share|improve this answer
    
by new hive you mean a hive created by code or like we can create a key entry and then load saved hive in that. If you mean latter then i'm getting the same error. I've create a key in the path HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\services\LoadTest but still i'm not able to load hive into LoadTest. I'm still getting the same error. Also if you mean former then why someone actually want to create a copy of hive? I can't think of use case for this, it will be really helpful if you elaborate the former. –  Hemant Sep 4 '12 at 17:44
    
@user1289810: I've added new content to my answer to address your questions. –  Harry Johnston Sep 4 '12 at 19:47

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