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Suppose I have the following code:

<div id="outerrt">
  <div id="rt" style="width: 200px; height: 200px; border: 1px solid black;">
    <span id="rt2">content</span>
  </div>
</div>

And I use the following:

$("#outerrt *").live("click", function () {
  alert($(this).attr('id'));
});

What it would give me when I click on the content text is three alert windows, in the following order:

rt2

rt

outerrt

What I actually want it to give me is only one id: rt2. How do I accomplish that?

share|improve this question
    
Use on instead of live –  Snake Eyes Sep 1 '12 at 9:31
    
@SnakeEyes But does on automatically accept newly created elements of the same circumstances? –  think123 Sep 1 '12 at 9:31
    
Then use delegate as mentioned in below answers from different users. See @undefined answer –  Snake Eyes Sep 1 '12 at 9:36
    
yes, events will bubble up the DOM tree until it reaches #outerrt. live, delegate and on will all trigger. delegate and on then check if the event started on something matching their more specific selector to decide whether to call the event handler. Newly created elements lower in the hierarchy still trigger at the #outerrt level. –  ronalchn Sep 1 '12 at 9:36

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use target property of the event object.

$(document).on("click", '#outerrt', function(event) {
      alert(event.target.id);
      // $(event.target).attr('id')
});
share|improve this answer
    
you shouldn't bind on document if you have a much closer element you can bind to –  Austin Greco Sep 1 '12 at 9:35
    
@agreco It seems that event delegation is not necessary here. How do you know that outerrt is a static element? –  Vohuman Sep 1 '12 at 9:38
    
good point, I guess I assumed that –  Austin Greco Sep 1 '12 at 9:39
    
This doesn't seem to be 100% jQuery. Can you make it like that? –  think123 Sep 1 '12 at 9:40
    
the OP binded live on #outerrt, so I think we can assume that this element is static, even if its contents are not. –  ronalchn Sep 1 '12 at 9:41

Is this what you want?

$("#rt2").live("click", function () {
  alert($(this).attr('id'));
});
share|improve this answer
    
sorry it isn't, as the content for rt is constantly changing, and may not even contain the rt2 element. –  think123 Sep 1 '12 at 9:33
    
I think what you can do I think is to apply the live click event to $("rt .your_added_obj") and to make sure to add the class "your_added_obj" to the object you will add. –  Littm Sep 1 '12 at 9:37
    
The OP says it needs to work with newly created objects, in which case binding directly to the object isn't appropriate. –  ronalchn Sep 1 '12 at 9:40
$('#outerrt').on( 'click', '#rt', function() {
  alert($(this).attr('id'));
});

edit: $(this) works just as well as $(e.target)

share|improve this answer

Actually it would only give you the first two alerts, as the #outerrt * selector doesn't match the element with id="outerrt".

To stop the event from bubbling, use the stopPropagation method:

$("#outerrt *").live("click", function (e) {
  e.stopPropagation();
  alert($(this).attr('id'));
});

In newer versions of jQuery the live and delegate methods are deprecated, and they have crammed all that functionality into the on method, so the equivalent code would be:

$("body").on("click", "#outerrt *", function (e) {
  e.stopPropagation();
  alert($(this).attr('id'));
});

However, you should put the delegate as close as possible to the elements where you want to catch the event, i.e. on the element where you will be loading the content. Example:

$("#outerrt").on("click", "*", function (e) {
  e.stopPropagation();
  alert($(this).attr('id'));
});
share|improve this answer
    
+1 good answer. –  Vohuman Sep 1 '12 at 9:50

Either bind it directly on #rt2, or use delegate or on instead (depending on your jQuery version).

Using delegate, you can pass a more specific selector:

$("#outerrt *").delegate("span","click", function () {
  alert($(this).attr('id'));
});

Similarly with on:

$("#outerrt").on("click", "#rt2", function(event){
  alert($(this).attr('id'));
});

In either case the more specific selector (span or #rt2) means that it only triggers if the click occurs on something matching that selector.

share|improve this answer
    
When you say depending on your jQuery version, I've got the latest (1.8.0). Can you tell me what to use for this specific version? Thanks. –  think123 Sep 1 '12 at 9:31
    
Use on. As of jQuery 1.7, on supersedes delegate. This means delegate is likely to be deprecated and removed in the future. –  ronalchn Sep 1 '12 at 9:33
    
@think123 .live() is deprecated, you should use .on(). More information found here: stackoverflow.com/questions/8359085/delegate-vs-on –  11684 Sep 1 '12 at 9:38

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