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I wish to do a run time comparison of two sorting algorithms- Bubble sot and Randomized Quick sort. My code works fine but I guess I am using some primitive techniques. The 'clock' calculations happen in int, so even if I try to get the time in micro seconds, I get something like 20000.000 micro seconds.

The code: Bubblesort:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdbool.h>
#include <time.h>
int bubblesort(int a[], int n);

int main()
{
int arr[9999], size, i, comparisons;
clock_t start;
clock_t end;
float function_time;    

printf("\nBuBBleSort\nEnter number of inputs:");
scanf("%d", &size);
//printf("\nEnter the integers to be sorted\n");
for(i=0;i<size;i++)
    arr[i]= rand()%10000;

start = clock();    
comparisons= bubblesort(arr, size);
end = clock();
/* Get time in milliseconds */
function_time = (float)(end - start) /(CLOCKS_PER_SEC/1000000.0);

printf("Here is the output:\n");
for(i=0;i<size ;i++)
    printf("%d\t",arr[i]);
printf("\nNumber of comparisons are %d\n", comparisons);
printf("\nTime for BuBBle sort is: %f micros\n ", function_time);

return 0;
}


  int bubblesort(int a[], int n)
{
bool swapped = false;
int temp=0, counter=0;

for (int j = n-1; j>0; j--)
    {
        swapped = false;
        for (int k = 0; k<j; k++) 
            {
                counter++;
                if (a[k+1] < a[k]) 
                {
                    //swap (a,k,k+1)
                    temp= a[k];
                    a[k]= a[k+1];
                    a[k+1]= temp;
                    swapped = true;
                }
            }
        if (!swapped)
            break;

    }
return counter;
}

Sample Output:

BuBBleSort
Enter number of inputs:2000
Time for BuBBle sort is: 20000.000000 micros

Quicksort:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>
int n, counter=0;
void swap(int *a, int *b)
{
int x;
x = *a;
*a = *b;
*b = x;
}

void quicksort(int s[], int l, int h)
{
int p; /* index of partition */
if ((h- l) > 0) 
{
    p= partition(s, l, h);
    quicksort(s, l, p- 1);
    quicksort(s, p+ 1, h);
}
}

int partition(int s[], int l, int h)
{

int i;
int p; /* pivot element index */
int firsthigh; /* divider position for pivot element */

p= l+ (rand())% (h- l+ 1);
swap(&s[p], &s[h]);
firsthigh = l;

for (i = l; i < h; i++)
if(s[i] < s[h]) 
    {
        swap(&s[i], &s[firsthigh]);
        firsthigh++;
    }

swap(&s[h], &s[firsthigh]);

return(firsthigh);
}  

int main()
{
int arr[9999],i;
clock_t start;
clock_t end;
float function_time;    


printf("\nRandomized Quick Sort");
printf("\nEnter the no. of elements…");
scanf("%d", &n);
//printf("\nEnter the elements one by one…");

for(i=0;i<n;i++)
    arr[i]= rand()%10000;

start = clock();    
quicksort(arr,0,n-1);
end = clock();
/* Get time in milliseconds */
function_time = (float)(end - start) / (CLOCKS_PER_SEC/1000.0);



printf("\nCounter is %d\n\n", counter);
printf("\nAfter sorting…\n");

for(i=0;i<n;i++)
    printf("%d\t",arr[i]);

printf("\nTime for Randomized Quick Sort is: %f ms\n", function_time);

return 0;
}

Sample Output:

Randomized Quick Sort
Enter the no. of elements…9999
Time for Randomized Quick Sort is: 0.000000 ms

As you can see, Quicksort doesn't show any run time with my technique even with a much larger input size than Bubblesort.

Could someone help in refining it with that part of run time comparison?

p.s.: The code is liberally borrowed from online sources

share|improve this question
1  
Simply run the programs both 1000 times. Runtime measurement will thereby get more precise, anyway, as "stochastic" unsystematic errors cancel out due to the law of large numbers. –  JohnB Sep 1 '12 at 10:38
    
@JohnB I appreciate your simple solution, but how on earth do you expect me to have a sort done when I run the algorithm thousand times each!! My output will obviously be just of the last run. –  pnp Sep 3 '12 at 5:17

1 Answer 1

Try the follwoing code.

printf("Clock() %ld", clock());
sleep(1);
printf("\t%ld\n", clock());

my result is...

Clock() 6582 6637

gettimeofday(2) is better than clock(3). Because gettiemofday(2) store time in a struct

struct timeval {  
    time_t      tv_sec;     /* seconds */  
    suseconds_t tv_usec;    /* microseconds */  
};

Record start time and stop time, then you can get elapsed time in microseconds by the formula

(stop.tv_sec - start.tv_sec) * 1000000. + stop.tv_usec - start.tv_usec
share|improve this answer
1  
In what way is gettimeofday better than clock? –  Max Leske Nov 20 at 19:50
    
@Max Leske I'm sorry the answer was too short. –  Leorge Takeuchi Nov 24 at 1:33
    
No worries. Your edit now makes for a much better answer. Well done. –  Max Leske Nov 24 at 7:03

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