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Lately I've been working on implementing a good collision detection system for my game. Before implementing it into my game I decided to make a sort of simulation. I've followed many tutorials (mainly this one) but I can get it working. I followed it step by step, but I don't know if my error is in the overlap (checking if the two projections overlap) or in the whole code itself.

The code has got the Vector2D and ConvexPolygon implementation as well. Here's the code:

http://pastebin.com/whV31SDi

It's pasted in pastebin because it's quite long.

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It is always a dilemma how much to expand acronyms in question titles—that have to be short too—but a Google match shows that for most computer scientists SAT risks evoking the boolean satisfiability problem. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boolean_satisfiability_problem –  Pascal Cuoq Sep 1 '12 at 11:40

2 Answers 2

Well as you say the code is rather long, and I didn't go through it all. But two errors stuck out

1) Your operator- is backwards

    Vector2D& operator - (const Vector2D& other)
    {
            Vector2D resultant;
            resultant = Vector2D(other.x - this->x,other.y - this-> y);
            return resultant;
    }

should be

    Vector2D& operator - (const Vector2D& other)
    {
            Vector2D resultant;
            resultant = Vector2D(this->x - other.x, this->y - other.y);
            return resultant;
    }

2) There are lots of style issues with your code. The biggest one is returning all your values by references to local variables. That is just asking for trouble because the variable no longer exists after the function returns. Here's a better way to write your operator+ for instance

   Vector2D operator+ (const Vector2D& other) const
   {
            return Vector2D(other.x + this->x, other.y + this->y);
   }

Still not perfect, because symmetrical operators like operator+ should be global functions not class members, but better than what you have.

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yes.. you are definitively right, but the problem remains.. –  Edoardo Tyger Dominici Sep 1 '12 at 11:50
1  
@EdoardoTygerDominici Well I don't know much about collision detection but isn't it a problem that your second polygon isn't convex? The tutorial you mentioned says this algorithm works for convex shapes only. In fact some people would say the second polygon isn't a polygon at all, because it's edges cross. –  john Sep 1 '12 at 13:25

I think it has to do with the fact you are using a bool-function to check the if there are overlaps.

In your for-loop you exit the function every time the shapes have not overlapped, and every frame the for loop starts over, and exits at the same place. change it to a void function.

I could be mistaken because I didn't really read all that code thorough, but I have had that problem myself.

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