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This is a difficult one to explain, so I welcome comments querying the details. Basically with jQuery you can do the following things:

.

What I want

$.ajax().etc()
$("selector").doStuff().etc()

Which means that $ is acting as a function (that is then chainable) as well as an object (also chainable).

.

What I've got

I am writing some javascript myself and have successfully made a chainable set of functions like so:

myF.func1().func2()
myF('text') //Cannot get this working!

.

I'm using window.myF=(new myFuncs()) to get the first line working, but I can't then use myF as a function. I've also made it so that myF can be used as a function, but then I can't chain the other functions.

I'm extremely confused and as much as I've tried searching this site and Google, I must be searching the wrong thing as I have no idea where to go from here!

Questions in the comments are welcomed and expected!

.

My Setup (simplified)

(function(){
    var myFuncs=function(){

    };

    myFuncs.prototype = {
          foo: function() {
          }
          ,bar: function() {
          }
    }

    window.myF = (new myFuncs());
})();
share|improve this question
    
How about just doing $.fn.myF = function(text) { ... }; if you're working with jQuery objects and wish to have it chainable ? –  adeneo Sep 1 '12 at 11:30
    
Thanks for the comment, but I'm not actually working with jQuery - I'm just after the way it can be called. –  SmokeyPHP Sep 1 '12 at 11:33
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I had a quick look at the jQuery source code and it looks like it doesn't use prototypes for the jQuery object - the window.$.

Instead it uses $.extend:

var myF = function(){};
$.extend(myF, {
   actAsAnObject: function(){}
});

However, for what I'll call the jQuery response object it does use prototypes. So if you call myF() this code gets run:

var myF = function(){
    return new myF.prototype.init(arguments); // based on the jQuery code
};

$.post is an object property, you can't get it if you call the function itself. $().html is a jQuery response object function, it is not a member of the window.$object.


Answer to your update: http://jsfiddle.net/rmpW8/

(function(){
    var myFuncExternal = function(num){
        return new myFunc(num);           
    };
    var myFunc = function(num){
        this.num = num;
    };

    $.extend(myFuncExternal, {
        foo: function(num){
            console.log("In foo with: " + num);
        }
    })

    myFunc.prototype = {
          foo: function() {
              myFuncExternal.foo(this.num);
          },
          bar: function() {
              console.log("In bar with: " + this.num)
          }
    }

    window.myF = myFuncExternal;
})();
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Just make your myF a function. The static methods on the jQuery object are just assigned to that function directly.

(function(exports) {

    exports.myF = function() {
        // This function can return an instance of itself, to make
        // it chainable.
    };

    exports.myF.staticFunction = function() {
        // This is a *static* function, available directly on `myF`
        // in the global space.
    };

})(this);
share|improve this answer
    
Right, okay, so I can't get this functionality as it is at the moment using myF.prototype={ foo:func(), bar:func() } ? –  SmokeyPHP Sep 1 '12 at 11:08
    
@SmokeyPHP That's the preferred method of adding methods on the prototype, yes. Keep in mind that will clobber any existing prototype property augmentations. –  alex Sep 1 '12 at 11:09
    
Okay, it's actually already set up to be a function - if you check out my updated post you can see what I've got. –  SmokeyPHP Sep 1 '12 at 11:15
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You'd do something like this:

myF = function () {
  ...
}
myF.method1 = function (){
  ...
}
myF.method2 = function (){
  ...
}
...

In Javascript, you have to remember that ANY data can have properties, even if it's not an "object", per se. So strings, numbers, functions, all of those can (and do) have properties. For example, strings have the property length.

share|improve this answer
    
So I'll just need to take it out of the prototype set I created? See my updated question with my setup. If i just change that to myFuncs.foo = function() etc that'll be it? –  SmokeyPHP Sep 1 '12 at 11:24
    
This is correct but it suggests that primitive values can be assigned own properties, which is not true. –  pimvdb Sep 1 '12 at 11:47
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