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I'm making a snakes and ladders game. I divided the screen with 10 horizontal lines and 10 vertical lines but the next problem I found was to number the specific slots.

Using outextxy() function I could only display specific numbers and trying with an array won't work:

int a[100];
for(i=0;i<100;i++)
{
    a[i]=i;
    outtextxy( x,y,a[i]);
}

This method didnt work as outtextxy() displays char values.
So alternatively I did this:

char a[100];
for(i=0;i<100;i++)
{
    a[i]=i;
    outtextxy( x,y,a[i]);
}

but then I came to know that outtextxy() works only on strings.

This way I will have to use 100 outtextxy() statements. Any ideas?

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What do you mean by: the next problem i found was to no in the specific slots ? –  brainydexter Sep 1 '12 at 12:04
    
Are you asking how to number each cell in this "grid" ? –  brainydexter Sep 1 '12 at 12:08
    
absolutely ,,,, i have been working hard yet no progress –  Siddhartha Sinha Sep 1 '12 at 12:09
    
Why not convert the int to a string and print that? Use sprintf or itoa. –  Steve Wellens Sep 1 '12 at 12:12
    
I've formatted your post a little, but please, watch the code formatting.. also, adding more "?"s to the question won't get you the answer more quickly.. –  quetzalcoatl Sep 1 '12 at 12:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If I understand your question correctly, you need to convert the integer to a string before giving it to outtextxy, so you need something like:

int a[100];
char output[MAX_OUTPUT_SIZE]; // For 0 to 99, MAX_OUTPUT_SIZE = 5 is more than enough
for(i=0;i<100;i++)
{ 
   a[i]=i;
   sprintf( output, "%d", i );
   outtextxy( x,y,output);
}

Note that the array a is totally incidental to this, so unless you need the array later, the following will work just as well:

char output[MAX_OUTPUT_SIZE]; // For 0 to 99, MAX_OUTPUT_SIZE = 5 is more than enough
for(i=0;i<100;i++)
{ 
   sprintf( output, "%d", i );
   outtextxy( x,y,output);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Now, why exactly do we need that int array for? :) –  jrok Sep 1 '12 at 12:13
    
I was assuming the OP is planning to use it later. Maybe that's not what he intended. I'll add a note about that. –  David Sep 1 '12 at 12:14
    
using that array was just a way to show the problems i was facing with displaying int values(not necessarily 1 - 100 ) –  Siddhartha Sinha Sep 1 '12 at 13:29
    
one more thing ...can u tell me what the %d does @David –  Siddhartha Sinha Sep 1 '12 at 13:56
1  
It's saying to interpret the input (i in this case) as a decimal integer. If you use %x, for example, it would make the string representing the input in hexadecimal. –  David Sep 1 '12 at 15:03

The basic idea is this:

int rows = 10;
int cols = 10;

for(int r = 0; r < rows; ++r){
 for(int c = 0; c < cols; ++c){
   cout << r << ", " << c;
   if(c != cols-1) cout << " ";
 }
cout << endl;
}

Now, if you want to display the value within the array, you have two choices depending on the array. If its a 2d array, it will look something like

cout << arr[r][c]; // you should understand the difference between row-major / column major

If its a 1-D array:

cout << arr[ (r * cols) + c ]
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