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My code:

 """
 def
 """
 k="""
 abc
 """
 print(k)
 print('abc2')

I try to run it:

  sam@sam-M51Kr:~/code/python$ python test.py 

  abc

  abc2
  sam@sam-M51Kr:~/code/python$

In the beginning of code, it seems """ become a comment.

But why k is two empty line with 'abc'?

Thank you~

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It can also be ''' –  the wolf Sep 1 '12 at 14:11
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5 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

""" is a string delimiter.

From PEP 257

A docstring is a string literal that occurs as the first statement in a module, function, class, or method definition. Such a docstring becomes the __doc__ special attribute of that object.

Thus your string just after the method is a comment and can be used by other tools to document your code. If you use an unassigned string literal elsewhere it is just a comment to help those reading the code (except in a couple of cases mentioned in the previous link)

From the python reference

In triple-quoted strings, unescaped newlines and quotes are allowed (and are retained), except that three unescaped quotes in a row terminate the string. (A “quote” is the character used to open the string, i.e. either ' or ".)

Thus includes the carriage returns/line feeds.

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""" ... """ is just a multi-line string. So

"""
abc
"""

is a newline, then abc then another newline.

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The first unassigned string of any object, in this case a module, is called the "docstring". It automatically gets assigned to the special variable __doc__ in the scope where it's defined.

The other is a multi-line string. These are "as-is" strings that preserve the embedded newline characters. So the first line, that assigns k, has a newline at the beginning and end of the string. You don't normally see it in a terminal.

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Q: "But why k is two empty line with 'abc'?"

k="""
 abc
 """

the """ (also ''') is a multi-line string delimiter that preserves the newlines, so there's a newline after the initial """, and one after the abc which is why you get the blank lines.

Using repr() you can see this explicitly:

repr(k)
"'\\n abc\\n '"

""" is used to write long, multi-line, strings, or as a documentation aid in the form of a docstring (or this) as you also correctly noted.

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This is a HERE-DOC syntax for easy writing long strings with multiple lines

see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Here_document
and: http://www.mtdev.com/2002/08/python-tutorial

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