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I switched from Perl to Python about a year ago and haven't looked back. There is only one idiom that I've ever found I can do more easily in Perl than in Python:

if ($var =~ /foo(.+)/) {
  # do something with $1
} elsif ($var =~ /bar(.+)/) {
  # do something with $1
} elsif ($var =~ /baz(.+)/) {
  # do something with $1
}

The corresponding Python code is not so elegant since the if statements keep getting nested:

m = re.search(r'foo(.+)', var)
if m:
  # do something with m.group(1)
else:
  m = re.search(r'bar(.+)', var)
  if m:
    # do something with m.group(1)
  else:
    m = re.search(r'baz(.+)', var)
    if m:
      # do something with m.group(2)

Does anyone have an elegant way to reproduce this pattern in Python? I've seen anonymous function dispatch tables used, but those seem kind of unwieldy to me for a small number of regular expressions...

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Whoops, right on... been using Python for too long! –  Dan Sep 23 '08 at 17:01
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9 Answers 9

up vote 5 down vote accepted
r"""
This is an extension of the re module. It stores the last successful
match object and lets you access it's methods and attributes via
this module.

This module exports the following additional functions:
    expand  Return the string obtained by doing backslash substitution on a
            template string.
    group   Returns one or more subgroups of the match.
    groups  Return a tuple containing all the subgroups of the match.
    start   Return the indices of the start of the substring matched by
            group.
    end     Return the indices of the end of the substring matched by group.
    span    Returns a 2-tuple of (start(), end()) of the substring matched
            by group.

This module defines the following additional public attributes:
    pos         The value of pos which was passed to the search() or match()
                method.
    endpos      The value of endpos which was passed to the search() or
                match() method.
    lastindex   The integer index of the last matched capturing group.
    lastgroup   The name of the last matched capturing group.
    re          The regular expression object which as passed to search() or
                match().
    string      The string passed to match() or search().
"""

import re as re_

from re import *
from functools import wraps

__all__ = re_.__all__ + [ "expand", "group", "groups", "start", "end", "span",
        "last_match", "pos", "endpos", "lastindex", "lastgroup", "re", "string" ]

last_match = pos = endpos = lastindex = lastgroup = re = string = None

def _set_match(match=None):
    global last_match, pos, endpos, lastindex, lastgroup, re, string
    if match is not None:
        last_match = match
        pos = match.pos
        endpos = match.endpos
        lastindex = match.lastindex
        lastgroup = match.lastgroup
        re = match.re
        string = match.string
    return match

@wraps(re_.match)
def match(pattern, string, flags=0):
    return _set_match(re_.match(pattern, string, flags))


@wraps(re_.search)
def search(pattern, string, flags=0):
    return _set_match(re_.search(pattern, string, flags))

@wraps(re_.findall)
def findall(pattern, string, flags=0):
    matches = re_.findall(pattern, string, flags)
    if matches:
        _set_match(matches[-1])
    return matches

@wraps(re_.finditer)
def finditer(pattern, string, flags=0):
    for match in re_.finditer(pattern, string, flags):
        yield _set_match(match)

def expand(template):
    if last_match is None:
        raise TypeError, "No successful match yet."
    return last_match.expand(template)

def group(*indices):
    if last_match is None:
        raise TypeError, "No successful match yet."
    return last_match.group(*indices)

def groups(default=None):
    if last_match is None:
        raise TypeError, "No successful match yet."
    return last_match.groups(default)

def groupdict(default=None):
    if last_match is None:
        raise TypeError, "No successful match yet."
    return last_match.groupdict(default)

def start(group=0):
    if last_match is None:
        raise TypeError, "No successful match yet."
    return last_match.start(group)

def end(group=0):
    if last_match is None:
        raise TypeError, "No successful match yet."
    return last_match.end(group)

def span(group=0):
    if last_match is None:
        raise TypeError, "No successful match yet."
    return last_match.span(group)

del wraps  # Not needed past module compilation

For example:

if gre.match("foo(.+)", var):
  # do something with gre.group(1)
elif gre.match("bar(.+)", var):
  # do something with gre.group(1)
elif gre.match("baz(.+)", var):
  # do something with gre.group(1)
share|improve this answer
1  
This is pretty cool! Nice work, MizardX. –  Dan Sep 25 '08 at 20:16
6  
The problem with this approach is that you only have one, global 'last match'. Any use of the module from multiple threads will break it, as will any use of the 'gre' module in signal handlers or code called from the 'if' bodies above. Take great care when using this, if you insist on using it. –  Thomas Wouters Sep 29 '08 at 11:22
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Using named groups and a dispatch table:

r = re.compile(r'(?P<cmd>foo|bar|baz)(?P<data>.+)')

def do_foo(data):
    ...

def do_bar(data):
    ...

def do_baz(data):
    ...

dispatch = {
    'foo': do_foo,
    'bar': do_bar,
    'baz': do_baz,
}


m = r.match(var)
if m:
    dispatch[m.group('cmd')](m.group('data'))

With a little bit of introspection you can auto-generate the regexp and the dispatch table.

share|improve this answer
2  
What if the three regular expressions are dissimilar? Like /^foo(.*)/, /(.*)bar$/, and /^(.*)baz(.*)$/ ? –  raldi Sep 23 '08 at 21:31
    
Then you need a bit more complex code. Build a dict mapping regexps to functions, or a list of (regexp, function) pairs if you want to apply them in a particular order. Apply each regexp and call the matching functions. For instance. –  Thomas Wouters Sep 23 '08 at 21:46
1  
You are moving definition of context-specific code too far from the place where it is used. –  J.F. Sebastian Oct 14 '08 at 3:56
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Yeah, it's kind of annoying. Perhaps this will work for your case.


import re

class ReCheck(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.result = None
    def check(self, pattern, text):
        self.result = re.search(pattern, text)
        return self.result

var = 'bar stuff'
m = ReCheck()
if m.check(r'foo(.+)',var):
    print m.result.group(1)
elif m.check(r'bar(.+)',var):
    print m.result.group(1)
elif m.check(r'baz(.+)',var):
    print m.result.group(1)

EDIT: Brian correctly pointed out that my first attempt did not work. Unfortunately, this attempt is longer.

share|improve this answer
    
Thats not going to work - python is call by value, so result won't be changed by the function. You could accomplish it by passing a mutable variable (eg. an object or a list) instead, or stashing the last result in a global or function attribute. –  Brian Sep 23 '08 at 19:14
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I'd suggest this, as it uses the least regex to accomplish your goal. It is still functional code, but no worse then your old Perl.

import re
var = "barbazfoo"

m = re.search(r'(foo|bar|baz)(.+)', var)
if m.group(1) == 'foo':
    print m.group(1)
    # do something with m.group(1)
elif m.group(1) == "bar":
    print m.group(1)
    # do something with m.group(1)
elif m.group(1) == "baz":
    print m.group(2)
    # do something with m.group(2)
share|improve this answer
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Alternatively, something not using regular expressions at all:

prefix, data = var[:3], var[3:]
if prefix == 'foo':
    # do something with data
elif prefix == 'bar':
    # do something with data
elif prefix == 'baz':
    # do something with data
else:
    # do something with var

Whether that is suitable depends on your actual problem. Don't forget, regular expressions aren't the swiss army knife that they are in Perl; Python has different constructs for doing string manipulation.

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1  
I guess regular expressions in the question were purely hypothetical so basing Your answer on them is wrong and does not answer the question in any way. –  Piotr Dobrogost Oct 31 '11 at 10:34
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def find_first_match(string, *regexes):
    for regex, handler in regexes:
        m = re.search(regex, string):
        if m:
            handler(m)
            return
    else:
        raise ValueError

find_first_match(
    foo, 
    (r'foo(.+)', handle_foo), 
    (r'bar(.+)', handle_bar), 
    (r'baz(.+)', handle_baz))

To speed it up, one could turn all regexes into one internally and create the dispatcher on the fly. Ideally, this would be turned into a class then.

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With thanks to this other SO question:

import re

class DataHolder:
    def __init__(self, value=None, attr_name='value'):
        self._attr_name = attr_name
        self.set(value)
    def __call__(self, value):
        return self.set(value)
    def set(self, value):
        setattr(self, self._attr_name, value)
        return value
    def get(self):
        return getattr(self, self._attr_name)

input = u'test bar 123'
save_match = DataHolder(attr_name='match')
if save_match(re.search('foo (\d+)', input)):
    print "Foo"
    print save_match.match.group(1)
elif save_match(re.search('bar (\d+)', input)):
    print "Bar"
    print save_match.match.group(1)
elif save_match(re.search('baz (\d+)', input)):
    print "Baz"
    print save_match.match.group(1)
share|improve this answer
    
The best answer out of all existing 10. –  Piotr Dobrogost Oct 31 '11 at 10:53
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Here's the way I solved this issue:

matched = False;

m = re.match("regex1");
if not matched and m:
    #do something
    matched = True;

m = re.match("regex2");
if not matched and m:
    #do something else
    matched = True;

m = re.match("regex3");
if not matched and m:
    #do yet something else
    matched = True;

Not nearly as clean as the original pattern. However, it is simple, straightforward and doesn't require extra modules or that you change the original regexs.

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how about using a dictionary?

match_objects = {}

if match_objects.setdefault( 'mo_foo', re_foo.search( text ) ):
  # do something with match_objects[ 'mo_foo' ]

elif match_objects.setdefault( 'mo_bar', re_bar.search( text ) ):
  # do something with match_objects[ 'mo_bar' ]

elif match_objects.setdefault( 'mo_baz', re_baz.search( text ) ):
  # do something with match_objects[ 'mo_baz' ]

...

however, you must ensure there are no duplicate match_objects dictionary keys ( mo_foo, mo_bar, ... ), best by giving each regular expression its own name and naming the match_objects keys accordingly, otherwise match_objects.setdefault() method would return existing match object instead of creating new match object by running re_xxx.search( text ).

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