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I've been looking for help on this for few hours now and can't find anything or maybe I'm just not looking in the right places.

I'm trying to create a simple program in Java wich takes three positve integers as command-line-argument and prints TRUE if any one of them is greater or equal to the sum of the other two and FALSE otherwise.

public class Triangle {

    public static void main(String[] args){
        int a = Integer.parseInt(args[0]);
        int b = Integer.parseInt(args[1]);
        int c = Integer.parseInt(args[2]);
        boolean isTriangle;

        isTriangle = (a + b >= c);
        isTriangle = (b + c >= a);
        isTriangle = (a + c >= b);
        System.out.println(isTriangle);
    }

}

Hope some of could maybe give me an answer or something that points me in the right direction so I can get this right.

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9  
And what have you tried so far? –  Jan Spurny Sep 1 '12 at 14:03
    
Is this a homework assignment? If it is please add the Homework tag. Your question will still be evaluated, it just needs to be properly tagged. Also, are you having problems writing the actual Java code or are you looking for the correct algorithm to use to compare the number? –  HeatfanJohn Sep 1 '12 at 14:03
1  
Not really a homework assignment since im not in school learning this but it is an exercise in the book Introduction to programming in java but i am having problems writing the code and thats what i need help with –  bangalo Sep 1 '12 at 14:07
    
public class Triangle { public static void main(String[] args){ int a = Integer.parseInt(args[0]); int b = Integer.parseInt(args[1]); int c = Integer.parseInt(args[2]); boolean isTriangle; isTriangle = (a + b >= c); isTriangle = (b + c >= a); isTriangle = (a + c >= b); System.out.println(isTriangle); –  bangalo Sep 1 '12 at 14:10
    
The reason your approach isn't working is because you keep reassigning the isTriangle boolean. For example, if a + b >= c, then isTriangle will be true (and should be for the rest of the program), but you reassign it in the next line to something that may or may not be true. **Edit: Shouldn't it be "c >= a + b" and not the other way around (same for the other two)? –  arshajii Sep 1 '12 at 14:22
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
public class Triangle {

    public static void main(String[] args){
        int a = Integer.parseInt(args[0]);
        int b = Integer.parseInt(args[1]);
        int c = Integer.parseInt(args[2]);
        boolean isTriangle;

        isTriangle = (a + b >= c) || (b + c >= a) || (a + c >= b);
        System.out.println(isTriangle);
    }

}
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I would just test each integer individually, since there are only 3 of them.

public static boolean test(int a, int b, int c) {
    return (a >= b + c || b >= a + c || c >= a + b);
}

As for the IO, you could use the Scanner class.

Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in);
int a = sc.nextInt();
int b = sc.nextInt();
int c = sc.nextInt();

Remember: import java.util.Scanner.

EDIT: I just saw that you wanted to take the integers as command line arguments, in which case you would just use Integer.parseInt(..) to turn the String arguments (components of the String[] that is the argument of the main method) into integers.

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The three conditions must be true, i.e., you need to use && not ||. –  davidbuzatto Sep 1 '12 at 14:21
2  
The question asked "if any one of them is greater or equal to the sum of the other two". –  arshajii Sep 1 '12 at 14:24
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Since you are learning Java, it is probably a good idea to start playing around with some of the Object orientation aspects of it as well. You could do something like the following:

public class Triangle{
    private int side1;
    private int side2;
    private int side3;

    public Triangle(int side1, int side2, int side3){
        this.side1=side1;
        this.side2=side2;
        this.side3=side3;
    }

    public boolean isValid(){
        return side1>0 && side2>0 && side3>0;
    }

    public boolean isTriangle(){
        return (side1+side2<=side3) 
            || (side1+side3<=side2) 
            || (side2+side3<=side1);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args){
        try{
            side1=Integer.parseInt(args[0]);
            side1=Integer.parseInt(args[0]);
            side1=Integer.parseInt(args[0]);

            Triangle t=new Triangle(side1,side2,side3);     
                if(t.isValid() && t.isTriangle())
                    System.out.println("Yes this makes a valid triangle");  

                else System.out.println("Sorry this is not a valid triangle");
        }
        catch(NumberFormatException e){
            System.out.println("Please make sure all arguments are numeric.");
        }            
    }
}

To go a bit further you could also extend this class to make a RightTriangle class. Since the fields for the triangles sides are private you would want to add getter methods in the Triangle class (public int getSide1(){return side1;}), for each of the sides.

public class RightTriangle extends Triangle{

    public RightTriangle(int side1, int side2, int side3){
        super(side1,side2,side3);
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isValid(){
        int a=getSide1();
        int b=getSide2();
        int c=getSide3();

        return super.isValid()
            && ((a*a + b*b = c*c)
                || (a*a + c*c = b*b)
                || (b*b + c*c = a*a));
    }

    public static void main(String[] args){
        //this is basically the same as the triangle class only now 
        //instantiate the RightTriangle class
        RightTriangle rt=new RightTriangle(side1,side2,side3);
            if(rt.isTriangle() && rt.isValid())
                System.out.println("Yes this is a valid right triangle");

            else System.out.println("sorry, this is not a right triangle");


    }

}
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Even better would be to force validation in constructor or before it in some factory method / class. Creating method isTriangle() invoked from object that is Triangle does not seem to be good idea :). –  dantuch Sep 1 '12 at 19:09
1  
I wouldn't put the validation in a constructor, its better not to do that unless absolutely necessary. I agree though, it would make more sense if this was a factory, but I figured that might add unnecessary complication (I was just trying to show a more Object Oriented way of approaching it). I also agree with the naming of that method, I just wasn't sure what else to call it. Using the isValid() would have made more sense but I added a class extending it to show overriding methods. (its just an example). You could also make a shape interface with isValid, getPerimeter() and getArea() etc. –  John Kane Sep 1 '12 at 19:32
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