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I'm having the following class setup (here only with relevant content):

// Message.h
class Message { };
typedef std::shared_ptr<Message> MessagePtr;
// Task.h
#include "Message.h"

/*
 * On include of Communication.h compilation fails.
 */

class Task {
public:
    send(const MessagePtr &msg) {
        // Call to Communication::send
    }

    MessagePtr recv() {
        // Call to Communication::recv
    }
};

typedef std::shared_ptr<Task> TaskPtr;
// Base.h
#include "Task.h"

class Base {
    std::map<TaskPtr, std::vector<TaskPtr>> taskMap;
};
// Runtime.h
#include "Base.h"

class Runtime : public Base { };
// Communication.h
#include "Base.h"

class Message; // Forward declaration

class Communication : public Base {
public:
    void send(const TaskPtr &caller, const MessagePtr &msg);
    MessagePtr recv(const TaskPtr &caller);
};

My goal is to provide kind of an independent communication layer within Communication to let tasks communicate with each other. The receiver list is defined within taskMap (kind of publish-subscribe where the sender does not know the receivers).

For this purpose my idea is to use a callback function (e.g. with std::bind or similar) from Task to Communication. However, I'm not able to implement this, since whenever I include the Communication Header within Task compilation fails, which is, due to circular includes.

So I'm not sure about how to forward declare send / recv from Communication to use them within Task. I've read this question, which is similar and also provides good answers, but I'd like to avoid to place a pointer to Communication within Task. The best possible solution seems to me to introduce kind of forward declaration for the members of Communication, but I'm afraid that I don't know how to accomplish this.

I've also thought about the class setup, whether it fits the purpose, but didn't come up with a better solution yet.

share|improve this question
    
Can you split the code up into separate pieces so it's clear which things are declared in which headers? And maybe a comment showing where you would like to be able to insert a callback function? –  Oktalist Sep 1 '12 at 14:47
    
Done, also added the current includes and a note on what include compilation fails. –  Sebastian Dressler Sep 1 '12 at 14:55
    
Nice. Now where do Task::send() and recv() get an instance of Communication from? And are you really defining those functions inline in the class definition, or in a separate Task.cpp file? (No need to edit the code if you can give simple answers to these.) –  Oktalist Sep 1 '12 at 15:04
    
looks like you don't understand jow forward declaration works. Did you have any .cpp file in project? Implement send/recv in cpp file which includes Communication.h and Task.h and you will have no cyclic dependencies. –  Rost Sep 1 '12 at 15:08
    
@Oktalist Functions are currently defined inline, but I'm going to change this. Initially I wanted to work header only (but this doesn't seems to work). The best (in terms of "wishes") would be if Task nothing knows about the instance of Communication, that's why I wanted to use std::bind, possibly Runtime can have the instance of Communication. Alternatively I could make those members static. –  Sebastian Dressler Sep 1 '12 at 15:12
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can put the declaration outside of the class. It doesn't prevent the library to be header-only, as you could inline those functions. You could arrange the functions like:

// Task.h
#include "Message.h"

class Task {
public:
    inline void send(const MessagePtr &msg);
    inline MessagePtr recv();
//  ^^^^^^
};

typedef std::shared_ptr<Task> TaskPtr;

// Communication.h
#include "Base.h"
#include "Task.h"

class Communication : public Base {
public:
    void send(const TaskPtr &caller, const MessagePtr &msg);
    MessagePtr recv(const TaskPtr &caller);
};

// Task.impl.h
#include "Communication.h"

inline void Task::send(const MessagePtr &msg) {
    // call Communication::send
}

inline MessagePtr Task::recv() {
    // call Communication::recv
}

And include Task.impl.h to have the two task methods defined.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh! Never thought about defining another header and using inline. Thanks. –  Sebastian Dressler Sep 1 '12 at 15:59
add comment
// Task.h
#include "Message.h"

class Task {
public:
    typedef std::function<void(const MessagePtr&)> SendFunc;
    typedef std::function<MessagePtr()> RecvFunc;
private:
    SendFunc sendfunc;
    RecvFunc recvfunc;
public:
    void setSendFunc(SendFunc& f) { sendfunc = f; }
    void setRecvFunc(RecvFunc& f) { recvfunc = f; }

    send(const MessagePtr &msg) {
        if (sendfunc) { /* call sendfunc */ }
    }
    MessagePtr recv() {
        if (recvfunc) { /* call recvfunc */ }
    }
};

typedef std::shared_ptr<Task> TaskPtr;
// Communication.h
#include "Base.h"

class Communication : public Base {
public:
    void send(const TaskPtr &caller, const MessagePtr &msg);
    MessagePtr recv(const TaskPtr &caller);
};
// in a function somewhere
taskptr->setSendFunc(std::bind(Communication::send, communicationInstance, taskptr));
taskptr->setRecvFunc(std::bind(Communication::recv, communicationInstance, taskptr));
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that solution, I've accepted the other one, since it directly targets header only, but I've upvoted this one also. –  Sebastian Dressler Sep 2 '12 at 8:38
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