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All,

Considering below sample "tree-like" graph.

Vertically it is a node "0" based level hierarchy structure. Horizontally it is a group based structure starting from level 1, a group means nodes inherited from one root node

    '''                         
                              +---+       
                              | 0 |                                    Level 0
                              +---+       
                                |
                 +--------------+---------------+         
                 |              |               |           
               +---+          +---+           +---+      
               | 1 |          | 2 |           | 3 |                    Level 1      
               +---+          +---+           +---+      
     +-----+----+        +-----+-----+        +|---+-----+            
     |     |     |        |     |     |        |    |     |           
   +---+ +---+ +---+    +---+ +---+ +---+   +---+ +---+ +---+  
   |11 | |12 | |13 |    |21 | |22 | |23 |   |31 | |32 | |33 |          Level 2 
   +---+ +---+ +---+    +---+ +---+ +---+   +---+ +---+ +---+  
     |     |   / |    /   |      |            |                 
     |     | /   | /      |      |            |  
     |   +---+ +---+    +---+ +---+           |
     |   |121|-|131|    |211| |221|           |                        Level 3                                 
     |   +---+ +---+    +---+ +---+           |
     |           |--------|------|            |
     |-----------|----------------------------|     


 |     Group 0       |       group 1     |      group 2       |
'''

Create in Networkx:

# create it in networkx
import networkx as nx
G = nx.DiGraph()
G.add_edges_from([('0', '1'), ('0', '2'), ('0', '3')])
G.add_edges_from([('1', '11'), ('1', '12'), ('1', '13')])
G.add_edges_from([('2', '21'), ('2', '22'), ('2', '23')])
G.add_edges_from([('3', '31'), ('3', '32'), ('3', '33')])
#
G.add_edges_from([('12', '121'), ('13', '131')])
G.add_edges_from([('12', '121'), ('13', '131')])
G.add_edges_from([('21', '211'), ('22', '221')])
#
G.add_edges_from([('13', '121')])  
G.add_edges_from([('21', '131')])  
G.add_edges_from([('131', '211')])  
G.add_edges_from([('131', '221')])

#
G.add_edges_from([('121', '13')])            # node may not with "in_degree" link only
G.add_edges_from([('131', '21')])            # ditto

#
G.add_edges_from([('131', '31')]) 
G.add_edges_from([('131', '11')])
G.add_edges_from([('11', '131')])

#
G.add_edges_from([('121', '131')])

Questions:

How to find out nodes and edges in Graph, by using below node as sample:

  1. "121", with more than one link to higher level in same group? (node edge type "unsure", may in_degree or out_degree or both, same in following question)

  2. "131", with more than one link to higner level nodes to other group?

  3. "131", with links to same level nodes in same group

  4. "131", with links to same level nodes but in other group

  5. "21", with links to lower level nodes in different group

New to "Graph" and try to get sample code fig-out how to use networkx dig deeper.

Thanks a lot.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

First you should somehow define in which group or level a node is, since it is not defined in the graph istelf due to the additional edges that destroy the tree structure. I just followed your naming pattern and wrote these helper functions to convert the given name into the level/group:

def get_group(node):
    if node == '0':
        return 1
    return int(node[0])-1

def get_level(node):
    if node == '0':
        return 0
    return len(node)

def equal_group(a,b):
    return get_group(a) == get_group(b)

def lower_level(a,b):
    return get_level(a) < get_level(b)

def equal_level(a,b):
    return get_level(a) == get_level(b)

Then you can go and filter nodes according to your specification:

def filter_q1(node):
    k = len([predecessor for predecessor in G.predecessors_iter(node) if equal_group(node, predecessor) and lower_level(predecessor, node)] )
    return k > 1
q1_result = filter(filter_q1, G)
print 'Q1:', q1_result


def filter_q2(node):
    k = len([predecessor for predecessor in G.predecessors_iter(node) if lower_level(predecessor, node)])
    return k > 1
q2_result = filter(filter_q2, G)
print 'Q2:', q2_result


def filter_q3(node):
    k = len([neighbour for neighbour in G.neighbors_iter(node) if equal_level(node, neighbour) and equal_group(node, neighbour)])
    return k > 0
q3_result = filter(filter_q3, G)
print 'Q3:', q3_result


def filter_q4(node):
    k = len([neighbour for neighbour in G.neighbors_iter(node) if equal_level(node, neighbour)])
    return k > 0
q4_result = filter(filter_q4, G)
print 'Q4:', q4_result


def filter_q5(node):
    k = len([neighbour for neighbour in G.neighbors_iter(node) if not equal_group(node, neighbour)])
    return k > 0
q5_result = filter(filter_q5, G)
print 'Q5:', q5_result

The result looks then like this:

>>>Q1: ['131', '121']
>>>Q2: ['131', '121']
>>>Q3: ['121']
>>>Q4: ['131', '121']
>>>Q5: ['21', '131', '0']

In general you can find your unwanted edges like this:

def is_bad_edge(edge):
    a, b = edge
    if not equal_group(a, b):
        return True
    if not lower_level(a, b):
        return True
    return False
bad_edges = filter(is_bad_edge, G.edges_iter())
print 'Bad edges:', bad_edges 

With this as result:

>>>Bad edges: [('21', '131'), ('131', '11'), ('131', '31'), ('131', '21'), ('131', '221'), ('131', '211'), ('121', '13'), ('121', '131'), ('0', '1'), ('0', '3')]

As you see also your edges originating from 0 are in there since it is classified as Group 1, but node 1 and node 3 are not. Depending on how you want to classify node 0 you can adjust the functions to include or exlcude the root node.

share|improve this answer
    
Michael, thanks for your help, however, can you explain a little more about the edge u changed 'G.add_edges_from([('12', '121'), ('12', '131')])' , in graph 12 and 131 should have no edge directly, also, is it possible to list unwanted edges as well besides of the nodes? thanks. –  user478514 Sep 6 '12 at 6:45
    
Okay, but at least that line is redundant because it's the same as the line above. I added something about the edges and removed the correction. –  Michael Mauderer Sep 6 '12 at 11:19
    
Michael, thanks, i just realize help functions you give out is node name based, right? here node 0 is automatically recognize as root by help function because of it's name, how about if I view from other direction the graph, for example view from right to left,e.g. node 33 as root? is it possibe the help function name unrelated? i think that is a key part of my confuse by your inspiration. –  user478514 Sep 6 '12 at 18:59
    
The main problem is, that you need a sound definition of what constitutes a "group" and a "level". This would be rather easy if you had a proper tree, but if you can have arbitrary edges in there it gets more complicated. E.g. how would you be able to classify node 131 as either group 1 or 2? It has parents in both, so which is the wrong edge? Is 131 really a child of 121 and therefore level 4? You might want to look for something more general like checking whether the graph is a tree and finding violations of the tree structure. –  Michael Mauderer Sep 6 '12 at 19:11
    
Oh and if you made node 33 the root, the whole thing would fall apart anyway because the direction of the edges would be all wrong. (node 33 has no children) –  Michael Mauderer Sep 7 '12 at 10:29

Something like this might work. It uses the length of the node as the level (had to comment out your level 0 node in your code to make that work) and the first element of the node string as the group. I think that is what you intended with your data structure.

# create it in networkx
import networkx as nx
G = nx.DiGraph()
#G.add_edges_from([('0', '1'), ('0', '2'), ('0', '3')])
G.add_edges_from([('1', '11'), ('1', '12'), ('1', '13')])
G.add_edges_from([('2', '21'), ('2', '22'), ('2', '23')])
G.add_edges_from([('3', '31'), ('3', '32'), ('3', '33')])
#
G.add_edges_from([('12', '121'), ('13', '131')])
G.add_edges_from([('12', '121'), ('13', '131')])
G.add_edges_from([('21', '211'), ('22', '221')])
#
G.add_edges_from([('13', '121')])
G.add_edges_from([('21', '131')])
G.add_edges_from([('131', '211')])
G.add_edges_from([('131', '221')])

#
G.add_edges_from([('121', '13')])            # node may not with "in_degree" link only
G.add_edges_from([('131', '21')])            # ditto

#
G.add_edges_from([('131', '31')])
G.add_edges_from([('131', '11')])
G.add_edges_from([('11', '131')])
G.add_edges_from([('121', '131')])

# "121", with more than one link to higher level in same group? (node edge type "unsure", may in_degree or out_degree or both, same in following question)

print "more than one link to higher level in same group"
for node in G:
    l = len(node)-1 # higher level
    others = [n for n in G.successors(node)+G.predecessors(node)
              if len(n)==l and n[0]==node[0]]
    if len(others) > 1:
        print node

# "131", with more than one link to higner level nodes to other group?
print "more than one link to higher level in same group"
for node in G:
    l = len(node)-1 # higher level
    others = [n for n in G.successors(node)+G.predecessors(node)
              if len(n)==l and n[0]!=node[0]]
    if len(others) > 1:
        print node


# "131", with links to same level nodes in same group
print "same level, same group"
for u,v in G.edges():
    if len(u) == len(v):
        if u[0] == v[0]:
            print u

# "131", with links to same level nodes but in other group
print "same level, other group"
for u,v in G.edges():
    if len(u) == len(v):
        if u[0] != v[0]:
            print u


# "21", with links to lower level nodes in different group
print "same level, other group"
for u,v in G.edges():
    if len(u) == len(v)-1:
        if u[0] != v[0]:
            print u
share|improve this answer
    
Aric, thanks for your answer also for your Networkx. But still I think by using len(node) is same as Michale's help function - it also rely on node "name" to distinguish “node level”, is it possible do it just by given a “root node” ? For example, by list path from node X to that “root node” to tell which possible level node X is(are)? –  user478514 Sep 8 '12 at 11:24
    
Yes, you could, for example, set levels = nx.shortest_path_length(G,'0') to get a Python dictionary of node and level. You could use that in place of the string length technique. –  Aric Sep 9 '12 at 3:33

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