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I am new to stackoverflow.

I just wanted to ask that, in my site I have menu like this:

About | Rules | Information | Branches | lessons | tests | testimony | experience ...

Now, I have about 50 menus like the above 8, that when clicked they will only display texts or images i.e. (NO sensitive data, forms, queries, db-connections..).

So, instead of creating individual .php/.html files or storing the text in database and calling them each time a user clicks through them, I've decided to create just two files called menus.php & process.php

Now in menu.php I made the links like this:

`<a href="http://site/process.php?process=about" > About Us </a>
<a href="http://site/process.php?process=rules" > Rules </a>
<a href="http://site/process.php?process=info" > Info </a>`

and in process.php I made this to get the link and output texts: `

$about = 'about';
$rules = 'rules';
$info = 'info';

if ($process == $about) {

echo 'About My Site '; } 
elseif($process == $rules){
echo 'Rules of this site';}
elseif($process == $info) {
 echo 'this is info';}

` Now, you may be/not wandering about my real question is but, as you can see this method saved me from creating 50 files to display 50 different things and saves me also make database connection in that page (which I don't like)

So, my real question is since I haven't seen people using this in tutorials, what do you think about it? Is this common practice, is it dangerous (even though DB/forms are not involved) is it good practice... or what would you recommend?

Thanks in advance

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closed as not constructive by deceze, DCoder, vascowhite, mario, Incognito Sep 1 '12 at 15:26

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
If you use $process directly without assignment, I STRONGLY recommend you turn off register_globals. –  Tibor Sep 1 '12 at 14:55
    
No. That approach is not uncommon. Where did you get the impression from? Also, it has no security implications by itself. A single entry point / dispatcher script is easier to maintain and audit. –  mario Sep 1 '12 at 14:58
1  
Welcome to Stack Overflow. Unfortunately this question is not the type of question that is considered suitable here and is likely to be closed. Please read the FAQ to see the kind of question that can be asked. Please don't take this personally and feel free to ask "practical, answerable questions based on actual problems that you face" at any time. –  vascowhite Sep 1 '12 at 14:59
1  
saves me also make database connection - what is the point of saving connections? do you have 133 MHz server with 16 MB RAM? –  Peter Sep 1 '12 at 14:59
1  
@vascowhite Seems a perfectly legitimate beginner question to me. –  Tibor Sep 1 '12 at 15:05

1 Answer 1

It's quite common for a PHP site to have a common entry point. Often this is coupled with mod_rewrite for example, so URLs like http://www.example.com/test1/test2 are rewritten to something like http://www.example.com/index.php?path=test1/test2.

If-elseif is a cumbersome approach though. You can use an associative array of polymorphic objects that will print out different pages according to the key, for example. If you have little options, you can use a switch like this. Then, you call a function in the base class.

switch ($_REQUEST['action'])
{
    case 'logout':    $frontend = new Login(Action::LOGOUT); break;
    case 'login':     $frontend = new Login(Action::LOGIN); break;
    case 'register':  $frontend = new Register(); break;
    default: $frontend = new VerbListing();
}

$frontend->Output();
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thanks btw, I am not at this level of sophistication in PHP, but I needed to resolve the question. thanks anyway –  samayo Nov 24 '12 at 0:00