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I know that in std::vector, the size will grow every time it runs out of room. Yet I'm not noticing a pattern in how it grows. Can someone please explain to me the pattern and why it was chosen.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
int main()
{
    vector<int> myVector;
    for(int i =0 ; i < 100; ++i)
    {
        myVector.push_back(i);
        cout << myVector.capacity();
    cout << ", ";
    }
}

Result:

1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 6, 9, 9, 9, 13, 13, 13, 13, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 28, 28, 28, 2
8, 28, 28, 28, 28, 28, 42, 42, 42, 42, 42, 42, 42, 42, 42, 42, 42, 42, 42, 42, 6
3, 63, 63, 63, 63, 63, 63, 63, 63, 63, 63, 63, 63, 63, 63, 63, 63, 63, 63, 63, 6
3, 94, 94, 94, 94, 94, 94, 94, 94, 94, 94, 94, 94, 94, 94, 94, 94, 94, 94, 94, 9
4, 94, 94, 94, 94, 94, 94, 94, 94, 94, 94, 94, 141, 141, 141, 141, 141, 141
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It's highly compiler dependedent, but I read somewhere (forgot source though) it grows by factor 2X in some implementations –  Mr.Anubis Sep 1 '12 at 16:06
    
This is not standardized, so it depends on the implementation. You can't rely on any patterns. –  juanchopanza Sep 1 '12 at 16:07
    
You can normally rely on the fact that when capacity is increased, it'll be new_capacity = old_capacity * some_factor;. The main area of variation is in the value of some_factor. This is normally carried out with integer arithmetic, so for the smaller numbers, rounding tends to hide the underlying pattern. –  Jerry Coffin Sep 1 '12 at 16:20
    
If you're using Microsoft's standard library then it increases by a factor of 1.5. Stephan T. Lavavej once said so in one of his online videos about the std. –  s3rius Sep 1 '12 at 23:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It depends on the implementation, so don't expect the same pattern when you switch the operating system, the compiler, etc.

The most common growth patterns are 1.5 * previous_capacity and 2 * previous_capacity. In your example, it seems that it's the former.

See http://stackoverflow.com/a/1100426/784668 for a possible explanation for why that factor was chosen. The point is that it apparently allows reusing free memory blocks that were previously used for storing the array.

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Why was this pattern chosen? Why not for example do it in a Fibonacci sequence? –  Caesar Sep 1 '12 at 16:07
1  
A Fibonacci sequence would also end up with O(log N) allocations for N push_backs, but is unnecessarily complicated. Occam's razor. –  aschepler Sep 1 '12 at 16:11
    
I remember reading that in the absence of other memory allocations a Fibonacci sequence is actually the best. Something to do with most efficient reuse of freed memory. –  john Sep 1 '12 at 16:55

It is an implementation detail, you are not supposed co care about it. In your case it seems to be something like

i += i/2

but somewhat more complex.

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Seems there's no +1 in general. Must be a special case for 1 -> 2. –  aschepler Sep 1 '12 at 16:13
    
I believe it's i += i/2 since 3 progresses to 4. –  Drew Dormann Sep 1 '12 at 16:14
    
@aschepler how about now? –  yuri kilochek Sep 1 '12 at 16:20
    
@indiv you are right –  yuri kilochek Sep 1 '12 at 16:58

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