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I have the following class :

public class Project {

    private int id;
    private String name;  

    public Project(int id, String name) {
        if(name == null ){
            throw new NullPointerException("Name can't be null");
        }

        if(id == 0 ){
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("id can't be zero");
        }

            this.name = name;
            this.id = id;

    }

    private Project(){}

    public int getId() {
        return id;
    }

    public void setId(int id) { 
        if(id == 0 ){
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("id can't be zero");
        }
        this.id = id;
    }

    public String getName()
        return name;
    }

    public void setName(String name) {
        if(name == null ){
            throw new NullPointerException("Name can't be null");
        }
        this.name = name;
    }

}

If you noticed that setName and setId share the same validation for its fields with the constructor. Is this redundant code that could cause issues in the future ( for example if somebody edit the the setter to allow 0 for the id and prevent -1 instead but didn't change the constructor) ? . Should I use a private method to do the check and share it between the constructor and the setter which seems too much if there's a lot of fields.

Note: This is why im not using the setters in the constructor. http://stackoverflow.com/a/4893604/302707

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4  
Use setters in CTORs if you are worried. –  Captain Giraffe Sep 1 '12 at 16:30
1  
Or (in case a setter cannot be called from Constructor), pass the validation logic to a shared, private method. –  SJuan76 Sep 1 '12 at 16:31
    
what's with the private constructor and validation in the getter? –  mre Sep 1 '12 at 16:32
1  
@Captain Giraffe: This is why im not using the setter stackoverflow.com/a/4893604/302707 –  Jimmy Sep 1 '12 at 16:33
1  
@Captain Giraffe: So what if someone override the setter without adding the validation (setters are not final) then projects subclass objects will not be valid. –  Jimmy Sep 1 '12 at 16:39
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4 Answers

Here is the revised code:

public class Project {

    private int id;
    private String name;  

    public Project(int id, String name, Date creationDate, int fps, List<String> frames) {

        checkId(id);
            checkName(name);
            //Insted of lines above you can call setters too.

            this.name = name;
            this.id = id;

    }

    private Project(){}

    public int getId() {
        return id;
    }

    public void setId(int id) { 
        checkId(id);
        this.id = id;
    }

    public String getName()
        return name;
    }

    public void setName(String name) {
            checkName(name);
        this.name = name;
    }

    private void checkId(int id){
       if(id == 0 ){
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("id can't be zero");
        }
    }

    private void checkName(String name){
            if(name == null ){
            throw new NullPointerException("Name can't be null");
        }
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
While a solution, it still does not address OPs concerns. –  Captain Giraffe Sep 1 '12 at 16:43
    
this is a trade off and depends on the developer requirement. depends on the way that they maintain their code. –  Heidarzadeh Sep 1 '12 at 16:45
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I recommend that you should define one method per field as isValid() and then call the same method in you setter as well as Constructor.

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But how do you think isValid could work for both id and name. –  Jimmy Sep 1 '12 at 19:02
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I would say yes. Rather than that, just call the setters from your constructor:

public Project(int id, String name, Date creationDate, int fps, List<String> frames) {
    setName(name);
    setId(id);
    // other stuff with creationDate, fps and frames?
}

Also, you shouldn't check for a null name in getName -- do it in setName. Otherwise, bugs are going to be hard to track down -- you want to catch the invalid name as soon as it comes in, not when it's used (which may be much later).

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IMHO, this is bad advice...unless you made the mutator methods final. –  mre Sep 1 '12 at 16:40
    
bad because if someone overrides setName and setId it could be catastrophe. it is not recommended to call non-private or non-final method in the constructor within the same class –  gigadot Sep 1 '12 at 16:46
    
Good catch to both; you should make the mutator methods (or the whole class) final if you go with this approach. Of course, if you go with an approach like isValid(String) or checkName(String), the same condition applies. –  yshavit Sep 1 '12 at 23:12
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if you make Project immutable, it will eliminate the redundant code. but for now, i think explicitly throwing exceptions in both the constructor and mutator methods is fine.

and i would not call the mutator methods within the constructor for many reasons, including this. also, i would remove the validation code in the accessor method...it's not necessary.

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