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There has been a long standing issue with Firefox not loading font from different origin than the current webpage. Usually, the issue arise when the fonts are served on CDNs.

Various solutions has been raised in other questions:

css @font-face not working with firefox, but working with chrome and IE

With the introduction of Amazon S3 CORS, is there a solution using CORS to address the font loading issue in Firefox?

Thanks in advance!

edit: It would be great to see a sample of the S3 CORS configuration.

edit2: I have found a working solution without actually understanding what it did. If anyone could provide more detailed explanations about the configs and the background magic that happens on Amazon's interpretation of the config, it will be greatly appreciated, as with nzifnab who put up a bounty for it.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 60 down vote accepted

OK, I finally got the fonts working using the config below with a little tweak from examples in the documentation.

My fonts are hosted on S3, but fronted by cloudfront.

I'm not sure why it works, my guess is probably that the <AllowedMethod> GET and <AllowedHeader> Content-* is needed.

If anyone proficient with Amazon S3 CORS config can shed some lights on this, it'll be greatly appreciated.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<CORSConfiguration xmlns="http://s3.amazonaws.com/doc/2006-03-01/">
    <CORSRule>
        <AllowedOrigin>https://mydomain.com</AllowedOrigin>
        <AllowedMethod>GET</AllowedMethod>
        <MaxAgeSeconds>3000</MaxAgeSeconds>
        <AllowedHeader>Content-*</AllowedHeader>
        <AllowedHeader>Host</AllowedHeader>
    </CORSRule>
    <CORSRule>
        <AllowedOrigin>https://*.mydomain.com</AllowedOrigin>
        <AllowedMethod>GET</AllowedMethod>
        <MaxAgeSeconds>3000</MaxAgeSeconds>
        <AllowedHeader>Content-*</AllowedHeader>
        <AllowedHeader>Host</AllowedHeader>
    </CORSRule>
</CORSConfiguration>

edit:

Some developers are facing issues of Cloudfront caching the Access-Control-Allow-Origin header. This issue has been addressed by the AWS staff in the link (https://forums.aws.amazon.com/thread.jspa?threadID=114646) below, commented by @Jeff-Atwood.

From the linked thread, it is advised, as a workaround, to use a Query String for differentiating between calls from different domains. I'll reproduce the shortened example here.

Using curl to check response headers:

Domain A: a.domain.com

curl -i -H "Origin: https://a.domain.com" http://hashhashhash.cloudfront.net/font.woff?https_a.domain.com

Response headers from Domain A:

Access-Control-Allow-Origin: https://a.domain.com
Access-Control-Allow-Methods: GET
Access-Control-Max-Age: 3000
Access-Control-Allow-Credentials: true
X-Cache: Miss from Cloudfront

Domain B: b.domain.com

curl -i -H "Origin: http://b.domain.com" http://hashhashhash.cloudfront.net/font.woff?http_b.domain.com

Response headers from Domain B:

Access-Control-Allow-Origin: http://b.domain.com
Access-Control-Allow-Methods: GET
Access-Control-Max-Age: 3000
Access-Control-Allow-Credentials: true
X-Cache: Miss from Cloudfront

You will notice the Access-Control-Allow-Origin has returned different values, which got past the Cloudfront caching.

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6  
Pretty disappointing documentation wrt this issue. –  pschuegr Sep 25 '12 at 0:43
1  
have you experienced issues similar to what's described here - the Access-Control-Allow-Origin header gets cached and invalidate CORS when a subsequent request is made through a different subdomain? –  o.v. Sep 29 '12 at 1:18
2  
You can have multiple AllowedOrigin elements inside a single CORSRule elements, so you could combine those CORSRules into a single element, since the other elements in them are identical. –  Beejamin Dec 6 '12 at 22:17
4  
@dan if the S3 bucket is served by CloudFront, it looks like the answer is to vary the font querystring by domain as documented in this official Amazon answer: forums.aws.amazon.com/thread.jspa?threadID=114646 –  Jeff Atwood Jan 26 '13 at 7:54
2  
This has been an extremely frustrating issue. The good news is that S3 now appears to be doing the right thing, so at least it is possible to serve everything other than webfonts through CloudFront and serve the font files directly from S3. Sadly, the querystring hack isn't really practical in our application without more significant refactoring, as the assets are all served through the Rails asset pipeline, and there's no convenient way to tweak the asset URLs at request time (they are all generated during deployment when the assets are precompiled). The font's URL in css is already up on S3. –  Zach Lipton Apr 30 '13 at 0:13

Well, the documentation states that you can stick the configuration as "the cors subresource in your bucket." I took this to mean I would create a file called "cors" at the root of my bucket with the configuration, but this would not work. In the end I had to login to the Amazon S3 administration area and add the configuration within the properties dialog of my bucket.

S3 could use some better documentation...

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1  
Yep, but I was lucky to spot some new interface changes at the properties panel. I've been editing bucket policies, so naturally I hunt for CORS configuration in the same panel. –  VKen Oct 1 '12 at 17:14
    
worked for me, i was looking to set this in my application, who knew it would be so simple –  Richlewis May 31 '13 at 11:47

In my case, I hadn't defined XML namespace and version in CORS configuration. Defining those worked.

Changed

<CORSConfiguration>

to

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<CORSConfiguration xmlns="http://s3.amazonaws.com/doc/2006-03-01/">
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Yes, of course. Firefox supports CORS for fonts, just like the spec requires at http://dev.w3.org/csswg/css3-fonts/#allowing-cross-origin-font-loading

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Thanks for your prompt response, Boris Zbarsky. Would you be able to show some example configurations for the S3 CORS settings? –  VKen Sep 3 '12 at 18:18
    
I've never looked into configuring S3... As far as what to send on the HTTP level, if you're OK with it just sending "Access-Control-Allow-Origin: *" in the HTTP response for the font files should work. –  Boris Zbarsky Sep 3 '12 at 20:46
    
Thanks, I'm trying to find out exactly how to do that setting with the S3 CORS configurations. –  VKen Sep 6 '12 at 15:41

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