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I have a system with a legacy database that I have to insert/update with manual SQL. Right now, I have something like this:

class Legacy  < ActiveRecord::Base
  establish_connection("legacy#{Rails.env}")
end

class Book < Legacy
end

book = Book.find(params[:isbn])
# CLEAN UP BELOW
Legacy.connection.exec_query("
          UPDATE dbo.Book Set Title = #{Legacy.connection.quote(book.Title)}
          WHERE dbo.Book.ISBN = '#{book.ISNB}')")    

Any ideas how to clean that up? It's a simplified example, in many cases there are multiple attributes in the Legacy table updated with one SQL statement.

I could add a new accessor

Set Title = #{book.Title!)

or simply:

Set Title = #{book.Title.send('quoted')}

Any other ideas?

UPDATE: here is an actual example:

result = Aim.connection.exec_query("
DECLARE @InsuredKey_PK int;
DECLARE @ResultVal varchar(125);
EXEC dbo.spAIMImportInsured #{tmpname}
, @InsuredKey_PK OUTPUT, @ResultVal OUTPUT, NULL, 'B', '#{submission.dba}', 
#{tmpaddr1}, #{tmpaddr2}, #{tmpcity}, '#{submission.state}', '#{submission.zip}' ,
#{tmpaddr1}, #{tmpaddr2}, #{tmpcity}, '#{submission.state}', '#{submission.zip}' 
, NULL, NULL, NULL, '#{submission.ProducerID}', 
'#{Employee.find(submission.acct_exec).first_name.downcase}',
'#{aim_name.Name}','#{aim_name.NameKeyPK}';
SELECT @InsuredKey_PK as insured_aim_key, @ResultVal as result;")

I sanitize like so:

class Insured < Legacy
  def self.update_attributes(id,update_hash)
    set_sql = ActiveRecord::Sanitization::ClassMethods.send(
      :sanitize_sql_for_assignment,update_hash
    )
    connection.exec_query("UPDATE dbo.Insured Set " + set_sql + 
      "WHERE dbo.Insured.InsuredID = #{id}"
    )
  end
end

called like this:

Insured.update_attributes(id,
  {:Address1 => params[:submission][:address1],
  :Address2 => params[:submission][:address2],
  :City => params[:submission][:city],
  :State => params[:submission][:state],
  :Zip =>params[:submission][:zip]
  })

I didn't realize it when I first posted, but I've come to learn that my issue comes about when I insert/update data in the Legacy database from data stored in my regular Rails (MySQL) database. What I ended up doing was to put this method in all my Regular models:

def quoted_for_legacy(attribute)
  Legacy.connection.quote(self[attribute])
end

So now, when I'm updating Legacy from data stored in regular Rails MySQL models:

"Set Foo = #{regmodel.quoted_for_legacy(:Foo)}"
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I use the Rails built-in method to do this. This lets you use all the convenient substitution shortcuts you can with other SQL in Rails. Just write a wrapper around the ActiveRecord method:

def sanitize(*array)
    return ActiveRecord::Base.send(:sanitize_sql_array, array)
end

Note: Looks like this method has been moved in the latest version. If you're using that, you'll want ActiveRecord::Sanitization::ClassMethods#sanitize_sql_array instead.

Then you can use the sanitize function whenever you need to sub variables into the SQL, just like you would normally. Hope that helps!

share|improve this answer
    
That works for me, thanks –  RadBrad Sep 1 '12 at 19:00
    
Ugg, I just updated my question, it's gonna be painful to construct the sql_array to sanitize. The variables that begin with tmp are the only ones that MUST be sanitized (come from forms). Any other ideas? –  RadBrad Sep 1 '12 at 19:22
    
@RadBrad - I'm not sure I know what you mean. You could certainly throw the "safe" variables in with string interpolation like you do now, and then use sanitize to escape the rest, but there are just so many total substitutions that nothing's going to end up being pretty... Can you give an example of what your code looks like when using sanitize? –  Xavier Holt Sep 1 '12 at 21:37
    
updated question, thanks for looking, BTW your answer sticks because you mentioning 'sanitize' was the key to me tracking down what was going on. –  RadBrad Sep 1 '12 at 22:43

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