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I currently got the following method, which is returning me percent-values. For example for an item-price of $350,000 and a percentage of 7%, it returns 24,500.

    public static decimal GetPercentValue(decimal? percentage, decimal baseValue)
    {
        decimal result = 0m;

        if (percentage != null)
        {
            try
            {
                result = Convert.ToDecimal(baseValue * percentage / 100m);
            }
            catch (OverflowException)
            {
                result = 0;
                Logger.Warn("OverflowException caught in GetPercentValue() - should better be handled UI-Sided!");
            }
        }

        return result;
    }

I don't think this is handled the right way, so is there any way to avoid an exception in this situation?

An OverflowException is being thrown when a user enters an insane number like 999,999,999,999,999,999 and calculates 9999999999% of it. This way I can't check percentage or baseValue for <= decimal.MaxValue simply because they aren't... The calculation result itself then exceeds the decimal range.

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I don't think this is handled the right way - how do you mean? It is not clear what you think the right way should be like. –  Oded Sep 1 '12 at 19:04
    
If you go over the maximum which is 79228162514264337593543950335 maybe you want to reconsider your approach ? –  coolmine Sep 1 '12 at 19:06
    
@Oded I'd think this should (or could) be possible without the heavy costs of an OverflowException by a simple if-statement. –  SeToY Sep 1 '12 at 19:06
2  
It probably isn't a problem. If you get the exception only on exceptional situations (such as crazy amounts that real users will not enter expecting a sane result), there really isn't an overhead. Don't look to fix problems you are not having. If you have identified this function as a bottleneck (after profiling), sure, fix it, but not before. –  Oded Sep 1 '12 at 19:07
    
I guess you're right. When something exceptional is being done, an exception should be thrown. That should take the user to re-consider their actions... :) –  SeToY Sep 1 '12 at 19:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The error handling should (most likely) be done outside the method. Right now you're hiding exceptions and returning wrong results (0 is returned when an error occures). The caller of your method cannot tell if the result is correct or if it's due to an OverflowException.

I'd rewrite the method like that:

public static decimal GetPercentValue(decimal? percentage, decimal baseValue)
{
    if (percentage == null)
        return 0;

    return baseValue*(percentage.Value/100);
}

And optionally add a validation method that the user can call to check the parameters before calling the real method.. validation errors could be displayed in the UI:

public static string ValidatePercentValue(decimal? percentage, decimal baseValue)
{
    try
    {
        GetPercentValue(percentage, baseValue);
        return null;
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        return ex.Message;
    }
}

Besides that note that...

baseValue*(percentage.Value/100)

... is better than...

baseValue*percentage.Value/100

Try to calculate 100% of decimal.MaxValue. The first one works while the second one throws an OverflowException.

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This is an old question, but I ran into a similar issue, and thought to provide a possible alternate solution. The problem happens when some calculation of two numbers produces a number greater than a MaxValue. This causes an exception, and is hard to test in the usual way:

decimal existingValue = decimal.MaxValue;
decimal newValue = (decimal)100;

//doesn't work -- exception thrown here
if(existingValue + newValue <= decimal.MaxValue)
{

}

The solution that seems to work for me (without using a Try-Catch block) is to rewrite the equation, in this case as a subtraction:

if(decimal.MaxValue - existingValue >= newValue)
{
    //DoSomething
}

MaxValue isn't exceeded because of the subtraction. I haven't tried a multiplication/division example, but I'm guessing it would work too.

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