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I learned that one of the motivation for copy constructor using is to avoid of the follow crash in the program -

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class Employee {
public:
    Employee(int ID,char const * name){...};
    ~Employee(){...};

    // Methods
    void Print();

private:
    // members
    int m_ID;
    char* m_name;
};

void MyFunc(Employee emp) {

    cout << "in MyFunc \n ";

}

int main() {
    Employee One(1,"Garen Torosian");

// calling copy constructor
    MyFunc(One);

    cout << "In the end of main \n";

// Here the program crashes!
    return 0;
}

as you can see the program should be crash before the return 0; , but when I run that program it works fine and terminated ok , why ?

Edit : In this case the program indeed crash -

// Employee.h
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class Employee {
public:
   Employee(int ID, 
                   const char* name);
  ~Employee();

  // Methods
  void Print();

private:
  // members
  int   m_ID;
  char* m_name;
};

// Employee.cpp
#include "Employee.h“

Employee::Employee(int iID, const char *name){ // Ctor
  cout << "Constructor called" << endl;
  m_ID = iID;
  m_name = new char [strlen(name) +1];
  strcpy(m_name, name);
  Print();
}
void Employee::Print() { // Print
cout << "ID: " << m_ID << ",Name:” << m_name
<< " ,Address(pointer):0x" << hex << (int) m_name<< endl;
}
Employee::~Employee() { // Dtor
  cout << "Destructor called"<<endl;
  Print();
  delete [] m_name;
  m_name=NULL;
}

void MyFunc(Employee emp) {

  cout << "in MyFunc \n ";    

}

int main()
{
    Employee One(1,"Eli Rachamim");

// calling copy constructor
MyFunc(One);

cout<< "In the end of main \n“;

// Here the program crashes! 
return 0;
}
share|improve this question
3  
Depends on what's in your ctor and dtor... also, UB means anything can happen, even simply working. –  Xeo Sep 1 '12 at 21:07
1  
I guess that there is delete this->m_name() in destructor and the crash is due to "double free detected". –  Greg Sep 1 '12 at 21:14
    
@Greg I think you nailed it. That with an allocation in the constructor code. Excellent psychic debugging. –  Drew Dormann Sep 1 '12 at 21:15
    
@Xeo you right , I tried to work less so I didn't implement all the dtor as in the example of my lecture . In the full example of the program it indeed crash . –  URL87 Sep 1 '12 at 21:19
    
I think you really should not think of programming "in order to avoid a crash". That's a really unhelpful mental model. If there's a crash, that's a result of a programming error, and crashes will disappear the more confident a programmer you become. –  Kerrek SB Sep 1 '12 at 21:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you d-tor is like

~Employee(){ delete[] name; }

and you alloc memory for your char* pointer, and you have no copy c-tor, than copy c-tor generated by compiler, that do memberwise-copy, will be called when you copy object. So, there will be double-free, that in most cases give you memory dump (in real calling destructor to already destructed object is UB and calling delete[] on already deleted object is also UB). But if you don't work with memory - copy c-tor, generated by compiler works well.

EDIT.

So, your second example demonstrates call of d-tor to allready destructed object and also double-free.

share|improve this answer

Why do you think it should crash?

C++ has the unfortunate feature of supplying an automatically-generated copy-constructor if you don't provide one, and your MyFunc() doesn't really do anything that would get screwed by that auto-generated copy.

share|improve this answer
    
C++ has the unfortunate feature of supplying an automatically-generated copy-constructor not in c++11 , you can simply delete whatever function you want :) –  Mr.Anubis Sep 1 '12 at 21:22
1  
Don't you mix up crash with compilation error? –  Lol4t0 Sep 1 '12 at 21:23

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