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I have a Mac App that's been in the app store for a year or so now. It was first published with target SDK 10.7, Lion. Upon the update to Mountain Lion it no longer works.

The application displays large images in an IKImageView which is embedded in an NSScrollView. The purpose of putting it into a scrollview was to get two finger dragging working, rather than the user having to click to drag. Using ScrollViewWorkaround by Nicholas Riley, I was able to use two finger scrolling to show the clipped content after the user had zoomed in. Just like you see in the Preview app.

Nicholas Riley's Solution: IKImageView and scroll bars

Now in Mountain Lion this doesn't work. After zooming in, pinch or zoom button, the image is locked in the lower left portion of the image. It won't scroll.

So the question is, what's the appropriate way to display a large image in IKImageView and have two finger dragging of the zoomed image?

Thank you,
Stateful

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Have you found the way correct this ? –  user08092013 Sep 14 '12 at 6:13
    
No, I had to submit an update with a workaround where I pulled the IKImageView out of the ScrollView if the user was using Mountain Lion. This means they have to click to drag. Pretty annoying. I did file a bug with Apple hoping they didn't do this on purpose. –  Stateful Sep 15 '12 at 22:10

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Well, Nicholas Riley's Solution is an ugly hack in that it addresses the wrong class; the issue isn't with NSClipView (which he subclassed, but which works just fine as is), but with IKImageView.

The issue with IKImageView is actually quite simple (God knows why Apple hasn't fixed this in what? … 7 years ...): Its size does not adjust to the size of the image it displays. Now, when you embed an IKImageView in an NSScrollView, the scroll view obviously can only adjust its scroll bars relative to the size of the embedded IKImageView, not to the image it contains. And since the size of the IKImageView always stays the same, the scroll bars won't work as expected.

The following code subclasses IKImageView and fixes this behavior. Alas, it won't fix the fact that IKImageView is crash-prone in Mountain Lion as soon as you zoom …

///////////////////// HEADER FILE - FixedIKImageView.h

#import <Quartz/Quartz.h>

@interface FixedIKImageView : IKImageView
@end






///////////////////// IMPLEMENTATION FILE - FixedIKImageView.m

#import "FixedIKImageView.h"


@implementation FixedIKImageView

- (void)awakeFromNib
    {
        [self setTranslatesAutoresizingMaskIntoConstraints:NO]; // compatibility with Auto Layout; without this, there could be Auto Layout error messages when we are resized (delete this line if your app does not use Auto Layout)
    }


// FixedIKImageView must *only* be used embedded within an NSScrollView. This means that setFrame: should never be called explicitly from outside the scroll view. Instead, this method is overwritten here to provide the correct behavior within a scroll view. The new implementation ignores the frameRect parameter.
- (void)setFrame:(NSRect)frameRect
    {
        NSSize  imageSize = [self imageSize];
        CGFloat zoomFactor = [self zoomFactor];
        NSSize  clipViewSize = [[self superview] frame].size;

        // The content of our scroll view (which is ourselves) should stay at least as large as the scroll clip view, so we make ourselves as large as the clip view in case our (zoomed) image is smaller. However, if our image is larger than the clip view, we make ourselves as large as the image, to make the scrollbars appear and scale appropriately.
        CGFloat newWidth = (imageSize.width * zoomFactor < clipViewSize.width)?  clipViewSize.width : imageSize.width * zoomFactor;
        CGFloat newHeight = (imageSize.height * zoomFactor < clipViewSize.height)?  clipViewSize.height : imageSize.height * zoomFactor;

        [super setFrame:NSMakeRect(0, 0, newWidth - 2, newHeight - 2)]; // actually, the clip view is 1 pixel larger than the content view on each side, so we must take that into account
    }


//// We forward size affecting messages to our superclass, but add [self setFrame:NSZeroRect] to update the scroll bars. We also add [self setAutoresizes:NO]. Since IKImageView, instead of using [self setAutoresizes:NO], seems to set the autoresizes instance variable to NO directly, the scrollers would not be activated again without invoking [self setAutoresizes:NO] ourselves when these methods are invoked.

- (void)setZoomFactor:(CGFloat)zoomFactor
    {
        [super setZoomFactor:zoomFactor];
        [self setFrame:NSZeroRect];
        [self setAutoresizes:NO];
    }


- (void)zoomImageToRect:(NSRect)rect
    {
        [super zoomImageToRect:rect];
        [self setFrame:NSZeroRect];
        [self setAutoresizes:NO];
    }


- (void)zoomIn:(id)sender
    {
        [super zoomIn:self];
        [self setFrame:NSZeroRect];
        [self setAutoresizes:NO];
    }


- (void)zoomOut:(id)sender
    {
        [super zoomOut:self];
        [self setFrame:NSZeroRect];
        [self setAutoresizes:NO];
    }


- (void)zoomImageToActualSize:(id)sender
    {
        [super zoomImageToActualSize:sender];
        [self setFrame:NSZeroRect];
        [self setAutoresizes:NO];
    }


- (void)zoomImageToFit:(id)sender
    {
        [self setAutoresizes:YES];  // instead of invoking super's zoomImageToFit: method, which has problems of its own, we invoke setAutoresizes:YES, which does the same thing, but also makes sure the image stays zoomed to fit even if the scroll view is resized, which is the most intuitive behavior, anyway. Since there are no scroll bars in autoresize mode, we need not add [self setFrame:NSZeroRect].
    }


- (void)setAutoresizes:(BOOL)autoresizes    // As long as we autoresize, make sure that no scrollers flicker up occasionally during live update.
    {
        [self setHasHorizontalScroller:!autoresizes];
        [self setHasVerticalScroller:!autoresizes];
        [super setAutoresizes:autoresizes];
    }


@end
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much, Uli! –  Stateful Oct 1 '12 at 3:45
    
This is really useful ... –  eddard stark Oct 9 '12 at 7:13
    
I this is old, but this is EXACTLY what I needed right now! Thanks Uli! –  PartiallyFrozenOJ Oct 11 at 17:13

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