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I want a function called findFirst that takes parameters n and q and returns the smallest prime number dividing n that is greater than or equal to q. So first I wrote a function that would say if a number is prime or not.

var isPrime = function(n){
    if(n === 1){
        return false;
    }
    else if (n === 2 || n === 3){
        return true;
    }
    else {
        for(i=2; i < n; i++){
            if(i * i >= n){
            for(j=2; j<=i; j++){
                    if(n % j === 0){
                        return false;
                    }
                }
            return true;
            } 
        }
    }
};

There could be other ways to make this more efficient, but I am pretty sure this function is not the problem.

So with this function I made my first attempt to write findFirst:

var findFirst = function(n,q){
    var p = q;
        while(n % p !== 0 || isPrime(p) === false){
            p++;
        }
    return p;
};

This function works, but with large numbers it crashes, for example it crashes on input (6310545154, 3). By the way the prime power decomposition of 6310545154 is 2 * 3155272577

So I wrote another function that would first just list the prime factors of a number:

var getFactors = function(n){
    var factors = [];
    var k = n;
    var p = 2;
    while(isPrime(k) === false && k !== 1){
        while(k % p !== 0 || isPrime(p) === false){
            p = p+1;
        }
        while(k % p === 0){
            k = k/p;
        }
        factors.push(p);
    }
    if(isPrime(k) === true){
        factors.push(k);
        return factors;
    }
    if(k === 1){
        return factors; 
    }
};

And now my second attempt at findFirst is:

var findFirst = function(n,q){
    var array = getFactors(n);
    var p = 0;
    for(i = 0; i < array.length; i++){
        if(array[i] >= q && p === 0){
            p = array[i];
        }
    }
    return p;
};

This one works great. It doesn't crash on that large number above and computes the result instantly. Can anyone see why this would happen? It seems like the 'while' loop in my original attempt is pretty similar to one of the 'while' loops in the getFactors function. And the second attempt looks a lot more complicated.

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You say what q is for; what about n? –  cheeken Sep 1 '12 at 22:40
    
It doesn't crash it just takes really long to compute, it returns 3155272577 is that the expected output? –  Musa Sep 1 '12 at 22:58
    
@cheeken: You're right, that should say "returns the smallest prime number dividing n that is greater than or equal to q". I will edit it. –  gmath Sep 1 '12 at 23:07
    
@Musa: maybe your computer has more power or something, but I get a chrome message saying the page is unresponsive. 3155272577 is the expected output and both attempts will produce that. I am wondering why the first attempt takes a long time and/or crashes, while the second works instantly. –  gmath Sep 1 '12 at 23:09

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The second program returns very quickly because your number only has one large prime factor; once it's found (all) the small prime factor(s) it quickly exits its loop. The first program has to count all the way from 3 up to 3155272577 before it discovers that it's a factor. After 2147483647 it has to switch from integer to floating-point arithmetic, which makes it even slower.

Note that

var isPrime = function(n) {
    ...
};

is an unusual way of creating a function; normally you would write

function isPrime(n) {
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
I get it, that makes sense. It still has to check that 3155272577 is prime, but I guess the square root is small enough to not crash my browser. Thanks for you help, and thanks for the syntax tip. I am new to coding. –  gmath Sep 1 '12 at 23:24

You have whole lot of bugs, in the code - for example, this way i is the global variable

for(i=2; i < n; i++){

What you want to do is

for(var i=2; i < n; i++){

Then later

factors[i] = k;

Where i is not defined and so on.

Run your code through jslint or jshint to make it fully correct first.

share|improve this answer
    
The factors[i] = k; is a typo, I pasted the code here, then went back and changed it in the code, but forgot to change both lines here. As for your other comment on the for loops, there isn't a problem, the code works fine. Keep in mind that in my question I never said that the code failed to run, just that one took a long time and other worked quickly. –  gmath Sep 1 '12 at 23:56
    
sure, but clean code is the only way to locate other bugs –  Bojan Bjelic Sep 3 '12 at 11:47

You can check for prime number real quick with regex.

function isPrimeNumber(n) {
    return !/^1?$|^(11+?)\1+$/.test((new Array(++n)).join('1'));
}

Read more on this post.

Edit: Maybe not optimal for large numbers though. More like a quick solution.

share|improve this answer
    
I am not familiar with regex. This whole project is just me trying to practice what I know. I will keep your function in mind in the future, although it doesn't seem to work past 7 digits. The one I wrote seems to work pretty quickly up to around 15 digits, after that it starts running slow, at least on my computer. –  gmath Sep 2 '12 at 0:05

This doesn't directly address the question, but I think it's important to stress that an unresponsive tab is NOT the same as a crash. Unresponsive simply means that the page's been executing JavaScript for a really long time.

Remember, there's no way for the browser to know for sure whether a script will ever complete without running the script - that's called the halting problem, and for a turing-complete programming language it's not solvable. The browser's offer to kill the script is based on a guess, and this is true no matter what the script in question is.

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You're right, I was using "crash" when I should have said "unresponsive". Thanks. –  gmath Sep 2 '12 at 0:21

The second attempt never executes p = p+1; and in fact executes the whole while only 2x in this getFactors part:

   while(k % p !== 0 || isPrime(p) === false){
        p = p+1;
    }

unlike the first attempt which has to test every number of p from '3' to 3155272577 for primality and factor of n in the first attempt:

    while(n % p !== 0 || isPrime(p) === false){
        p++;
    }

Why?
The second attempt starts with var p = 2; and var k = n; which means (k % p === 0) and isPrime(p) are both true (when n=6310545154)

while(isPrime(k) === false && k !== 1){
    while(k % p !== 0 || isPrime(p) === false){
        p = p+1;                                               /*  this is never executed for findFirst(6310545154, 3)  */
    }
    while(k % p === 0){
        k = k/p;
    }
    ...

and then k = k/p; immediately reduces k to 3155272577 which terminates the outer while(isPrime(k) === false ...

To observe the same aberrant time behaviour in the second attempt, use:
var factors = [2]; and var p = 3; .

ref: Eratosthenes Sieve - Wikipedia

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