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I have come across a weird thing while using the std::lock_guard. NOTE: I am using MSVS 2012 and the std::lock_guard as declared in the mutex header from the new c++11 headers that are included and shipped in this version.

The following is code to replicate this behaviour, and it seems like using this function increments the dll LoadCount for some reason, my question is if anyone can explain why, and is there a better lock function I can use that wont mess with the LoadCount?

#include <windows.h>
#include <mutex>

typedef struct _PEB_LDR_DATA {
ULONG Length;
BOOLEAN Initialized;
PVOID SsHandle;
LIST_ENTRY InLoadOrderModuleList;
LIST_ENTRY InMemoryOrderModuleList;
LIST_ENTRY InInitializationOrderModuleList;
} PEB_LDR_DATA, *PPEB_LDR_DATA;


typedef struct _LSA_UNICODE_STRING {
    USHORT Length;
    USHORT MaximumLength;
    PWSTR  Buffer;
} LSA_UNICODE_STRING, *PLSA_UNICODE_STRING;
typedef LSA_UNICODE_STRING UNICODE_STRING, *PUNICODE_STRING;

typedef struct _RTL_USER_PROCESS_PARAMETERS {
   BYTE           Reserved1[16];
   PVOID          Reserved2[10];
   UNICODE_STRING ImagePathName;
   UNICODE_STRING CommandLine;
} RTL_USER_PROCESS_PARAMETERS, *PRTL_USER_PROCESS_PARAMETERS;

typedef VOID (NTAPI *PPS_POST_PROCESS_INIT_ROUTINE) (VOID);

typedef struct _PEB {
    BYTE                          Reserved1[2];
    BYTE                          BeingDebugged;
    BYTE                          Reserved2[1];
    PVOID                         Reserved3[2];
    PPEB_LDR_DATA                 Ldr;
    PRTL_USER_PROCESS_PARAMETERS  ProcessParameters;
    BYTE                          Reserved4[104];
    PVOID                         Reserved5[52];
    PPS_POST_PROCESS_INIT_ROUTINE PostProcessInitRoutine;
    BYTE                          Reserved6[128];
    PVOID                         Reserved7[1];
    ULONG                         SessionId;
} PEB, *PPEB;
typedef struct _PROCESS_BASIC_INFORMATION
{
    PVOID Reserved1;
    PPEB PebBaseAddress;
    PVOID Reserved2[2];
    ULONG_PTR UniqueProcessId;
    PVOID Reserved3;
} PROCESS_BASIC_INFORMATION;
typedef enum _PROCESSINFOCLASS
{
    ProcessBasicInformation = 0,
} PROCESSINFOCLASS, *PPROCESSINFOCLASS;

typedef struct _LDRP_CSLIST
{
    PSINGLE_LIST_ENTRY Tail;
} LDRP_CSLIST, *PLDRP_CSLIST;
typedef enum _LDR_DDAG_STATE
{
LdrModulesMerged = -5,
LdrModulesInitError = -4,
LdrModulesSnapError = -3,
LdrModulesUnloaded = -2,
LdrModulesUnloading = -1,
LdrModulesPlaceHolder = 0,
LdrModulesMapping = 1,
LdrModulesMapped = 2,
LdrModulesWaitingForDependencies = 3,
LdrModulesSnapping = 4,
LdrModulesSnapped = 5,
LdrModulesCondensed = 6,
LdrModulesReadyToInit = 7,
LdrModulesInitializing = 8,
LdrModulesReadyToRun = 9
} LDR_DDAG_STATE;
typedef struct _LDR_DDAG_NODE
{
LIST_ENTRY Modules;
PVOID ServiceTagList;
ULONG LoadCount;//this is where its located in windows 8
ULONG ReferenceCount;
ULONG DependencyCount;
union
{
    LDRP_CSLIST Dependencies;
    SINGLE_LIST_ENTRY RemovalLink;
};
LDRP_CSLIST IncomingDependencies;
LDR_DDAG_STATE State;
SINGLE_LIST_ENTRY CondenseLink;
ULONG PreorderNumber;
ULONG LowestLink;
} LDR_DDAG_NODE, *PLDR_DDAG_NODE;
typedef struct _LDR_MODULE {
LIST_ENTRY InLoadOrderModuleList;
    LIST_ENTRY InMemoryOrderModuleList;
    LIST_ENTRY InInitializationOrderModuleList;
    PVOID BaseAddress;
    PVOID EntryPoint;
    ULONG SizeOfImage;
    UNICODE_STRING FullDllName;
    UNICODE_STRING BaseDllName;
    ULONG Flags;
    USHORT obsoleteLoadCount;//in windows 8 this is obsolete
    USHORT TlsIndex;//but we can still use it in win 7 and below
union
{
        LIST_ENTRY HashLinks;
        struct CheckPtr
        {
            PVOID SectionPointer;
            ULONG CheckSum;
        };
};
union
{
        ULONG TimeDateStamp;
        PVOID LoadedImports;
};
struct _ACTIVATION_CONTEXT *EntryPointActivationContext;
PVOID PatchInformation;
PLDR_DDAG_NODE DdagNode;
} LDR_MODULE, *PLDR_MODULE;

typedef NTSTATUS (__stdcall *pfnZwQueryInformationProcess) (HANDLE, PROCESSINFOCLASS,
    PVOID, ULONG, PULONG);
pfnZwQueryInformationProcess ZwQueryInformationProcess;

DWORD GetModuleLoadCount(HMODULE hmod)
{
    HMODULE hModule = LoadLibrary("ntdll.dll");
    if(hModule==NULL)
       return NULL;
    ZwQueryInformationProcess = (pfnZwQueryInformationProcess) GetProcAddress(hModule, 
        "ZwQueryInformationProcess");
    if (ZwQueryInformationProcess == NULL) {
        FreeLibrary(hModule)
        return NULL;    // failed to get PEB
    }

PROCESS_BASIC_INFORMATION pbi;
    PROCESSINFOCLASS pic = ProcessBasicInformation;
    if (ZwQueryInformationProcess(GetCurrentProcess(), pic, &pbi, sizeof(pbi), NULL) 
        != STATUS_SUCCESS)
    {
        // ZwQueryInformationProcess failed...
        FreeLibrary(hModule);
        return NULL;
    }
    FreeLibrary(hModule);

LDR_MODULE *peb_ldr_module = (LDR_MODULE 
        *)pbi.PebBaseAddress->Ldr->InLoadOrderModuleList.Flink;
while((peb_ldr_module = (LDR_MODULE 
        *)peb_ldr_module->InLoadOrderModuleList.Flink)!=(LDR_MODULE 
        *)pbi.PebBaseAddress->Ldr->InLoadOrderModuleList.Blink) {
    if(peb_ldr_module->BaseAddress==hmod) {
        //well this actualy works in windows 8...
        //and probably vista with aero enabled as well...
        //anyway if it is obsolete its always 6
        //so we can if it out like this...
        if(peb_ldr_module->obsoleteLoadCount==6)
            return peb_ldr_module->DdagNode->LoadCount;
        else
            return peb_ldr_module->obsoleteLoadCount;
    }
}
if(peb_ldr_module->BaseAddress==hmod) {
    if(peb_ldr_module->obsoleteLoadCount==6)
        return peb_ldr_module->DdagNode->LoadCount;
    else
        return peb_ldr_module->obsoleteLoadCount;
}
}

mutable std::mutex g_logMutex;
void test()//test is just a function inside of my dll
{          //which is injected and running under low privileges in internet explorer as
           //an addon, I dont think that matters, but i dont want to leave any info out 
           //that might help answer my question.
int loadcount = GetModuleLoadCount((HMODULE)gModule);//its 1 here
    std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock(g_logMutex);
loadcount = GetModuleLoadCount((HMODULE)gModule);//now its 2
}
share|improve this question
    
Erm, no. lock_guard does none of that. If there's a bug in the code is completely unrelated. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 1 '12 at 23:06
    
I traced into the function and after a while it arrives at this function: RegisterAsyncTimerAndLoadLibrary so it does indeed seem like its by design, only problem is that it doesnt decrement when its finished, so I would definately call this a MS bug –  user1621065 Sep 1 '12 at 23:50
    
it's a pity there are no usable answers. I'm getting the same crash in some other context. The same pattern though with the lock_guard –  Dmitry Ledentsov Oct 26 '12 at 14:22

1 Answer 1

If it does, it's undefined behaviour. C++ doesn't "know" about DLLs (since DLLs are Windows-specific).

More likely, you're either seeing a race-condition in action, or the std::lock_guard implementation you're using is leaking a module handle.

share|improve this answer
    
I think u are right about it leaking a module handle, it increments the loadcount but never decrements it... maybe thats by design, but it sure is anoying... –  user1621065 Sep 1 '12 at 23:54
    
It may be by design of YOUR SPECIFIC implementation of std::lock_guard - but it isn't be design of std::lock_guard IN GENERAL. Do not rely on this behaviour. –  SecurityMatt Sep 2 '12 at 0:59
    
"MY SPECIFIC" implementation... well I guess I should have been clear and I have updated my question to reflect this, I am using MSVS 2012 and the std:: dist that comes with THEIR implementation of c++11. I would think that it will be if its not already the most common implementation... –  user1621065 Sep 3 '12 at 15:12
1  
It doesn't matter if it's a common implementation. It matters that this behaviour is not guaranteed by the C++ spec. Any behaviour not documented is subject to change at any time without notice. If you rely on this behaviour, your code may randomly fail at some later point when you compile on another platform, due to a Windows Update patch or on some customer machines. Always use functions according to how they are documented to behave. Never rely on undocumented behaviours. –  SecurityMatt Sep 6 '12 at 11:46

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