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Ok here is the problem, I have three NSStrings with int values, when the view loads this needs to run:

NSCalendar* gregorian = [[NSCalendar alloc]
      initWithCalendarIdentifier:NSGregorianCalendar];

unsigned int uintFlags = NSDayCalendarUnit | NSHourCalendarUnit | NSMinuteCalendarUnit | NSSecondCalendarUnit;
NSDateComponents* differenceComponents = [gregorian components:uintFlags
                    fromDate:quitDate toDate:nowDate options:0];

NSString *hours1 = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d",[differenceComponents hour]];
hours = hours1;

NSString *minutes1 = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d",[differenceComponents minute]];
minutes = minutes1;

NSString *seconds1 = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d",[differenceComponents second]];
seconds = seconds1;

Those NSString now have int values in it, so I can't set int's to static any suggestions? I wanted to do this way so I won't it...

- (void)updater:(id)sender {
    [NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:1.0f target:self
        selector:@selector(timer:) userInfo:nil repeats:YES];
}
- (void)timer:(id)sender {
    // I get error right here that says (initialize 
    // element is not a compile-contstant)
    static int hour = hours.intValue;
    static int minute = minutes.intValue;
    static int second = seconds.intValue;

    NSString *sec = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%i",second];
    if (seconds1 < 10) {
        sec = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"0%i",second];
    }
    NSString *min = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%i",minute];
    if (minutes1 < 10) {
        min = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"0%i",minute];
    }
    NSString *hours5 = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%i",hour];
    NSString *timerTime = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@:%@:%@" ,hours5 ,min ,sec];
    label1.text = timerTime;
    seconds1 ++;
    if (seconds1 > 59) {
        seconds1 = 00;
        minutes1 ++;
    }
    if (minutes1 > 59) {
        minutes1 = 00;
        hours1 ++;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Like Tikhop says, remove "static" on the declarations. It doesn't belong there. –  Hot Licks Sep 2 '12 at 0:42

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Why do you want to use static? I don't get the point of making those variables static. And why using NSString to encapsulate your int values as well?!?? Why not store the int values directly?

Actually you shouldn't either rely of adding the seconds yourself at each execution of the timer method, because an NSTimer can drift, so after some time (quite long time, sure, but still) you can have this drift affect the "seconds" part. Better recompute the timeInterval each time. And why bother adding the leading "0" yourself, when you could use %02i format instead?

Actually your code can be as simple and concise as this:

-(void)timer:(NSTimer*)sender
{
    NSTimeInterval elapsedTime = -[quitDate timeIntervalSinceNow];
    label1.text = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%02i:%02i:%02i",
                    (int)elapsedTime/3600,
                   ((int)elapsedTime/60  ) % 60,
                   ((int)elapsedTime     ) % 60];
}
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this was an example and i forgot to remove the ( seconds < 10 ) .. i thought it will be the best for the phone, because it doesn't have to recalculate.. but THANKS for help!! –  Stackie Sep 2 '12 at 3:03
    
BUT NOW there are tree issues that says ( "Local declaration of'seconds' hides instance variable" ) what can i do? –  Stackie Sep 2 '12 at 4:42

static variable can't be "dynamic". The compiler should know what the value has been assigned before the program run.

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just move them to instance variables of said view controller, and set/calculate their values at initialization. done.

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The reason why you would want those integers to be static eludes me, still here's a trick that will let you have static (global) data that can be initialized in runtime (dynamically). Just create a class method that manages it:

@interface MyClasss : NSObject

+ (NSDateComponents *)dateComponents;
+ (NSInteger)hours;
+ (NSInteger)minutes;
+ (NSInteger)seconds;

@end

@implementation MyClass

+ (NSDateComponents *)dateComponents
{
    NSCalendar* gregorian = [[NSCalendar alloc]
    initWithCalendarIdentifier:NSGregorianCalendar];

    unsigned int uintFlags = NSDayCalendarUnit | NSHourCalendarUnit | NSMinuteCalendarUnit |     NSSecondCalendarUnit;
    NSDateComponents* differenceComponents = [gregorian components:uintFlags
                    fromDate:quitDate toDate:nowDate options:0];
}

+ (NSInteger)hours
{
    NSString *hoursText = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d",[self dateComponents hour]];
    return hoursText.integerValue;
}

+ (NSInteger)minutes
{
    NSString *minutesText = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d",[self dateComponents minute]];
    return minutesText.integerValue;
}

+ (NSInteger)seconds
{
    NSString *secondsText = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d",[self dateComponents second]];
    return secondsText.integerValue;
}

@end

Now you have static data at your disposal which can be accessed without instantiating an object:

NSInteger hours = [MyClass hours];
share|improve this answer
    
well, each NSInteger hours = [MyClass hours]; call will produce several intermediate objects -- i believe that is what the OP was hoping to avoid. Faster execution over syntactical convenience -- although syntax may have been the whole reason. shrug –  justin Sep 2 '12 at 2:29

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