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I've just started learning c++ and am trying to write a program for finding the area of a circle. I've written the program and whenever I try to compile it I get 2 error messages. The first is:

areaofcircle.cpp:9:14: error: expected unqualified-id before numeric constant

and the second is:

areaofcircle.cpp:18:5: error: 'area' was not declared in this scope

What should I do? I would post a picture, but I'm a new user, so I can't.

#include <iostream> 
using namespace std; 
#define pi 3.1415926535897932384626433832795 
int main() 
{
    // Create three float variable values: r, pi, area 
    float r, pi, area; 
    cout << "This program computes the area of a circle." << endl; 

    // Prompt user to enter the radius of the circle, read input value into variable r 
    cout << "Enter the radius of the circle " << endl; 
    cin >> r; 

    // Square r and then multiply by pi area = r * r * pi; 
    cout << "The area is " << area << "." << endl; 
}
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2  
And, where is the program? post it here. Copy the text, not a picture. –  Óscar López Sep 2 '12 at 0:17
1  
Please post a code example that shows your error. We promise not to steal it :-) –  Adrian Cornish Sep 2 '12 at 0:17
1  
How about posting code? Do you understand what the errors mean? –  tenfour Sep 2 '12 at 0:17
    
Nevermind, figured it out. I had essentially defined pi twice. –  user1641173 Sep 2 '12 at 0:25
    
You can edit the post... –  sehe Sep 2 '12 at 0:26

3 Answers 3

The problem is relatively simple. See below.

#define pi 3.1415926535897932384626433832795 
int main() 
{
    // Create three float variable values: r, pi, area 
    float r, pi, area; 
...

Notice you use a macro expansion for pi. This replaces the variable name pi in your declaration with the text 3.1415926535897932384626433832795. This causes the error seen here:

error: expected unqualified-id before numeric constant

Now, since this caused parsing to fail on that statement, area winds up never being declared (since it's after pi). As a result, you also then recieve the following error:

error: 'area' was not declared in this scope

Note that you also actually assign neither pi nor area... you need to do that first.

As a general rule of thumb, don't use macros for constants in C++.

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>

int main() {
  using std::cin;
  using std::cout;
  using std::endl;
  using std::atan;

  cout << "This program computes the area of a circle." << endl;

  cout << "Enter the radius of the circle " << endl;
  float r;
  cin >> r;

  float pi = acos(-1.0f);
  float area = 2 * pi * r;
  cout << "The area is " << area << '.' << endl;

  return 0;
}
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1  
Another good tip - use clang instead of gcc and get better error messages that actually explain what's going on in much more detail (and in colour!). –  Carl Norum Sep 2 '12 at 0:35
    
@CarlNorum haha woops, I was looking at the errors from another post a second ago and my mind slipped... you're right... :-p –  oldrinb Sep 2 '12 at 0:40

For starters, you never actually assign anything to 'area', so it remains undefined (effectively contains a random number). Try adding the line area = r * r * pi; before the last cout. You also want to remove the float pi from the variable list since it collides with the #define pi at the top. Later, when you learn about #include <math> you may find an M_PI constant inside so that you don't have to do it yourself.

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1  
M_PI is non-standard. –  oldrinb Sep 2 '12 at 0:43

Modified code that builds and works fine :

///--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------!
// file:    Area.cpp
//
// summary: console program for SO

#include <iostream> 

using namespace std; 

const double PI = 3.1415926535897932384626433832795;


int main() 
{
    // Create three float variable values: r, pi, area 
    double r, area; 
    cout << "This program computes the area of a circle." << endl; 

    // Prompt user to enter the radius of the circle, read input value into variable r 
    cout << "Enter the radius of the circle " << endl; 
    cin >> r; 

    // Square r and then multiply by pi area = r * r * pi; 
    area = PI*r*r;
    cout << "The area is " << area << "." << endl;

    return 0;
}
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