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What's wrong with var x = new Array();

if (!Number.prototype.toZeroPaddedString) {
  Number.prototype.toZeroPaddedString = function (count) {
    "use strict";
    var str = this.toString();
    return (new Array(count + 1 - str.length)).join('0') + str;
  };
}

I want my code to be clean by jsLint standards, however, I just cannot imagine how to get rid of this error given what I want to do.

Any advice?

Thanks.

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marked as duplicate by Andreas Köberle, jonsca, tereško, Donal Fellows, AVD Sep 4 '12 at 12:25

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Not at all. How exactly do you plan to apply the answer to the question you mention in my case? –  mark Sep 2 '12 at 3:27
    
I'm sorry, I didn't realize the depth of this question. –  Jeremy Sep 2 '12 at 3:30
    
And make sure you tidy your script with tabs or 4 spaces instead 2 spaces –  Elieder Sep 2 '12 at 3:33
1  
I have defined it as 2, so I am good with that respect. –  mark Sep 2 '12 at 3:38
    
Elieder - that is a) personal preference and b) tabs suck on SO on iDevices and 4 spaces is a waste of space on any mobile/tablet so I strongly disagree! –  mplungjan Sep 2 '12 at 4:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try this:

if (!Number.prototype.toZeroPaddedString) {
  Number.prototype.toZeroPaddedString = function (count) {
    "use strict";
    var str = this.toString();
    var ary = [];
    ary.length = count + 1 - str.length;
    return ary.join('0') + str;
  };
}
share|improve this answer

The array literal notation is an alternative to using new Array() because Crockford (rightfully) doesn't like the new keyword. The notation is [], just as the literal notation for new Object() is {}. To make it so that the length of the array is as desired, you can set .length on an array.

return (new Array(count + 1 - str.length)).join('0') + str;

To:

var arr = [];
arr.length = count + 1 - str.length;
return arr​.join('0') + str;
share|improve this answer
2  
I may be dead wrong, but I believe new Array(someNumber) is different from new Array(elem1, elem2, ...) in that it creates an array of length someNumber with undefined elements. –  delnan Sep 2 '12 at 3:27
    
new Array(2) === [undefined, undefined] whereas [2] is just [2]. Your answer seems to be simply misleading. –  mark Sep 2 '12 at 3:28
    
Sorry for the confusion @delnan, I've updated my post, Mark. –  Jeremy Sep 2 '12 at 3:34
    
Now that's what I call misuse of the comma operator. Why not split that up in separate statements? Also, you're missing a var, your version makes arr global. –  delnan Sep 2 '12 at 3:38
    
@delnan I've updated again. Setting var wasn't working as I expected, so I set it as a global. –  Jeremy Sep 2 '12 at 3:40

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