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Given an enumeration defined like so:

enum DebugModeType {
    DebugModeNone = 0,
    DebugModeButton = 1,
    DebugModeFPS = 2,
    DebugModeData = 4
};
#define DebugMode DebugModeButton|DebugModeData

I expect the value of DebugMode&DebugModeFPS to be 0, but I observe it to be 1.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need parentheses in your macro to overcome operator precedence:

#define DebugMode (DebugModeButton|DebugModeData)

As-is:

DebugMode & DebugModeFPS

= DebugModeButton | DebugModeData & DebugModeFPS

(which is parsed as DebugModeButton | (DebugModeData & DebugModeFPS))

= DebugModeButton | (4 & 2)

= DebugModeButton | 0

= DebugModeButton

= 1

With parentheses as I suggest:

= (DebugModeButton | DebugModeData) & DebugModeFPS

= 5 & DebugModeFPS

= 5 & 2

= 0

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nice nice. #define DebugMode (DebugModeButton|DebugModeData) or #define DebugMode DebugModeButton+DebugModeData also works well. Give it a high priority. Thank you very much. –  zszen Sep 2 '12 at 7:53
1  
Better yet, don't use macros, use constants, and avoid this any many other macro pitfalls. –  Paul R Sep 2 '12 at 8:31
    
@zszen I recommend against using + operator because if you have some bit flags already set you will end up unsetting it and setting some other flag unintentionally. –  Richard Mar 19 '13 at 17:33
    
@Richard . Thx, I now usally use bit operator instead + operator –  zszen Mar 29 '13 at 10:56

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