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In a Qt application, if we have the following for example:

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QApplication a(argc, argv);
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QObject::connect(&button, SIGNAL(clicked()), &a, SLOT(quit()));
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Here, I know button is the object that will send the signal. Thus, a is the object that will respond to the signal. In this case, a is a QApplication object. But, what does it really represent? For example, we knew that button is a button object, then what does a represent? Is it simply a window?

Thanks.

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4  
Please read the docs, QApplication's role is well documented. –  Mat Sep 2 '12 at 7:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The QApplication does not represent any visual element. Instead it represents the whole "program" - which is of course something of more abstract a nature.

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Citing from the Qt documentation

The QApplication class manages the GUI application's control flow and main settings.

The most important task of a QApplication instance is handling events: Whenever you move the mouse, for example, the application receives events from the OS (or window system), which the QApplication instance will dispatch and forward to your GUI. Also, when you emit a signal, QApplication's event loop will call the connected slots.

Other tasks in which QApplication is involved:

  • Command line parsing
  • Styling (choosing the right look for the widgets depending on the OS)
  • Session management
  • Translations/Internationalization
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