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I am trying to design a generic Key class in java to represent primary pojo keys.

The values can be of various types i.e. BigInteger, String, Uuid's . I am looking for best option to implement such a class. My current implementation looks something like this.

Can anyone help me with a more accurate implementation or identify issues with the current implementation? I am yet to implement a equals method. Any pointers are welcome.

This class needs to be GWT compatible.

@SuppressWarnings("serial")
@GwtCompatible
public class Key<T extends Serializable> implements Serializable {

public enum KeyType {
    BigInt, Uuid, String ;

}

private final T keyValue  ;
private final KeyType keyType  ;

Key() {
    keyValue = null;
    keyType = null;
}

public Key(T value){
    this.keyValue =  value ;
    this.keyType = determineKeyType(value);
}

/**
 * @return
 */
private KeyType determineKeyType(Object value) {

    if ( isValueUuid(value))
        return KeyType.Uuid ;

    else if (value instanceof BigInteger)
        return KeyType.BigInt ;

    else 
        return KeyType.String; 
}

/**
 * @param value
 * @return
 */
private boolean isValueUuid(Object value) {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub
    return false;
}

public Key(T val, KeyType tp){
    this.keyValue = val ;
    this.keyType = tp;
}

public KeyType getKeyType(){
    return keyType ;
}


@Override
public boolean equals(Object obj) {
    return super.equals(obj);
}

public T getKeyValue(){
    return this.keyValue ;
}
}
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Is there an existing GWT compatible implementation available that does something more or less like this? What are the best practices applicable in this case ? –  Gautam Sep 2 '12 at 7:52
    
Note - Some methods are yet to be implemented. –  Gautam Sep 2 '12 at 7:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It looks to me me that you would benefit from a Factory pattern here.

You would have an interface Key, an AbstractKey, and as many implementations of this AbstractKey as you want (in your example case, it should be 3). The KeyFactory would be in charge of creating the key.

Practically, it would give:

public interface Key<T> extends Serializable {
    T getKeyValue();
}

public abstract class AbstractKey<T> implements Key<T> {

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj) {
        if (obj == null) {
            return false;
        }
        if (obj instanceof AbstractKey) {
            return getKeyValue().equals(((AbstractKey) obj).getKeyValue());
        }
        return false;
    }
}

public class StringKey extends AbstractKey<String> {

    private String keyValue;

    StringKey() {
        super();
    }

    protected StringKey(String val) {
        super(val);
        this.keyValue = val;
    }

    @Override
    public String getKeyValue() {
        return keyValue;
    }
}

public class BigIntKey extends AbstractKey<BigInteger> {

    private BigInteger keyValue;

    BigIntKey() {
        super();
    }

    protected BigIntKey(BigInteger val) {
        super(val);
        this.keyValue = val;
    }

    @Override
    public BigInteger getKeyValue() {
        return keyValue;
    }
}

...

public class KeyFactory {
    public static Key<String> getKey(String obj) {
        return new StringKey(obj);
    }

    public static Key<BigInteger> getKey(BigInteger obj) {
        return new BigIntKey(obj);
    }
}

One advantage of this solution, even if it's more verbose than the one you already have, is that you can restrict the types of your Keys to what you actually need. In addition, with constructors that have limited visibility (just enough to make GWT compile properly), you can enforce the code to use the KeyFactory.

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Any idea what will it look like if we want to avoid the factory and use guice injection ? Can we attain the same result by using a guice provider / binding ? –  Gautam Sep 3 '12 at 9:17
    
There is one issue here from my need perspective. What happens when I receive a Key reference and I don't know the type ? i.e. I won't be able to determine the type of the Key inside. how do you propose we overcome that ? –  Gautam Sep 3 '12 at 9:19
    
You can have another method in the Key interface getType() and the implementation classes would implement it in that way: Class<?> getType() { return keyValue.getClass();} –  aymeric Sep 3 '12 at 11:19

Not sure about the rest but your equals delegates to the equals of Object which is identity based. Is this what you want? It seems not since you want to check for keys that could be of various types.
Also if you override equals then you must override hashCode

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