Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working on a Visual C++ 2010 Express console application.

Before I go into all this detail, the summary here is: How can I make an array/list/vector of functions and call them from that array.

So I'm having a little difficulty with function pointers. I'm writing a 'Terminal' class, which in turn has a member class 'CommandMap'. The purpose of the CommandMap class is to store a vector/array of functions and the strings that represent them in another vector/array. I want the functions to be called (only) when the class calls them from the vector, but it executed only when I added it to the vector and not when trying to call it.

I tried defining a type for it

typedef void (*CmdCallback)();

declared a vector to contain them

vector<string> CmdNames;
vector<CmdCallback> CmdFuncs;

I add them to them like so:

// Map a new command
bool CommandMap::Map(string name, CmdCallback func)
{
    if (!IsNullOrSpace(name) && func != NULL)
    {
        if (!Exists(name))
        {
            CmdNames.push_back(name);
            CmdFuncs.push_back(func);
            return true;
        }
    }

    return false;
}

And try calling them like this:

// Get a command callback from its identifier
CmdCallback CommandMap::GetFunc(string name)
{
    int index = IndexOf(name);
    if (index == -1) return NULL;
    else return CmdFuncs.at(index);
}

// If the given string is a command indentifier
// it will invoke the associated callback.
bool CommandMap::Exec(string input)
{
    for each (string id in CmdStrings)
    {
        if (input == id)
        {
            CmdCallback cmd;
            cmd = GetFunc(id);
            cmd();
            return true;
        }
    }

    return false;
}

I tried using this:

CmdCallback SayHello()
{
    cout << "Hello World!" << endl;
    return NULL; // Forces me to return null, guessing since its
                 // not 'void' but a 'void' pointer it must return something
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    App = new Terminal(argc, argv);
    App->Commands->Map("say", SayHello);

    while (!App->ExecComplete)
    {
        App->WaitEnter();
        App->Commands->Exec("say");
        App->WaitEnter();
        App->ExecComplete = true;
    }

    return App->ExitCode;   
}

This works, at first... The function gets called when i try to Map() it though. And when I Exec() "say", it finds the callback, but when it tries to call it i get this runtime error to which I can see no detail other than the option to break or continue. The code it gives me is.

I pretty much want to abandon my method and try a new approach, maybe Im going the wrong way with the void pointer typedef, and I need to throw a '&' or a '*' somewhere I haven't like in the Map() argument list. Maybe a vector isnt the best way to do this either.

Basically I am asking, how can I make an array of functions that can (and only) be called by referencing them from the array. I'm terrible with callbacks. I would greatly appreciate anybody who offers me help on this, thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Consider using vector<pair<string, CmdCallback>> or an unordered_map<string, CmdCallback> instead of two parallel vectors. Make sure your cmd = GetFunc(id) returns a non-null value before calling it. –  DCoder Sep 2 '12 at 8:40
    
You must learn something about function pointers. You can learn something from here. IF your functions are not static or are class memebers, you must also learn how to bind them, for example with boost::bind. –  Jepessen Sep 2 '12 at 8:42
    
What exactly is your application intending to do which requires an array-of-functions? –  Ben Cottrell Sep 2 '12 at 8:53
    
@DCoder Thanks, I was unaware of making a vector of pairs and the unordered_map container, I'll have to look at the latter, but I don't much like using iterators, mainly due to my lack of knowledge about them. –  Brandon Miller Sep 2 '12 at 9:04
    
@BenC Well it all works now :) But what this does is allows me to map a command string (ex. "exit") with a function (ex. ExitApp()) and so when I use cin >> input; I can check if the user entered that command, whatever command the user enters, it gets passed to CommandMap->Exec(input), then it looks up the callback pertaining to that string, in this case the user enters "exit", gets passed to Exec(), and calls ExitApp(). Works like a charm now! Always wanted to programmatically parse user entered commands instead of using a switch() condition –  Brandon Miller Sep 2 '12 at 9:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If I understand correctly you actually want to declare SayHello as void SayHello() so that a pointer to SayHello has the type void (*)() (i.e. CmdCallback) which is what you need for your vector of functions.

share|improve this answer
    
Everybody else had very good advice, but you seem to have done the trick! Thank you! I thought I had to make the actual callback function of type 'CmdCallback', what I thought was a complicated problem was solved by basically only omitting a '*'. Strange I only got a runtime error and not a compiler error. Well thanks! –  Brandon Miller Sep 2 '12 at 8:59

You can use std::functions, or, if you don't have C++11 support, boost::function. These are function object wrappers that can be easily constructed from free or member functions. You can store these in a standard library container or simple array.

share|improve this answer
    
I have VS2010 Express, which I heard has only some support for C++11. But I use Boost libraries and I think they're great. I will have to look at Boost.Function in the future, I read a bit about it. But had a bit of trouble wrapping my head around whether the boost::function you declare is a typedef for use with other functions or just an object that you can assign other functions to. –  Brandon Miller Sep 2 '12 at 9:03
1  
@BrandonMiller it is a callable object that you can initialize with various types of function. You can also assign to it. –  juanchopanza Sep 2 '12 at 9:07
    
So how could I call them from a container? I ask because it seems that whatever I add to the vector does not need to have a specific function signature. Or would I declare the vector like so?: vector<std::function<void(int,char*)>> FuncList; –  Brandon Miller Sep 2 '12 at 9:19
1  
@BrandonMiller right, the signature and return type determine the type of the function object, and you can only have one type in the container. –  juanchopanza Sep 2 '12 at 9:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.