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I found really hard to write unit test for this method, it basically exits the program when user types a quit command.

SytemExit class:

public class SystemExit {
    public void exit(int status) {
        System.exit(status);
    }
}

My static method:

public static void exitWhenQuitDetected() {
final SystemExit systemExit = new SystemExit();
final String QUIT = "quit";
String line = "";
try {
    final InputStreamReader input = new InputStreamReader(System.in);
    final BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader(input);
    while (!(line.equals(QUIT))) {
        line = in.readLine();
        if (line.equals(QUIT)) {
            System.out.println("You are now quiting the program");                  
            systemExit.exit(1);
        }
    }
} catch (Exception e) {
    System.err.println("Error: " + e.getMessage());
}
}   

Something is not quite right here as I am struggling to unit test the method exitWhenQuitDetected (I am using Mockito for mocking). How would I mock the InputStreamReader and verify the SystemExit.exit method gets called when it sees a quit? Can you shed some lights on this please? Thanks.

Added the test I am working on at the moment, it's not working.

    @Test
@Ignore
public void shouldExitProgramWhenTypeQuit() {
    String quit = "quit";           
    SystemExit systemExit = mock(SystemExit.class);
    try {
        BufferedReader bufferedReader = mock(BufferedReader.class);
        when(bufferedReader.readLine()).thenReturn(quit + "\n");
        SomeClass.exitWhenQuitDetected();
        verify(systemExit, times(1)).exit(1);
    } catch (IOException e) {           
        e.printStackTrace();
    }       
}
share|improve this question
    
Please add your Mockito code. –  user647772 Sep 2 '12 at 8:45
    
That is exactly what I am asking, I am struggling to come up with the test for this. –  Can Lu Sep 2 '12 at 8:48
    
Welcome to Stack Overflow! We encourage you to research your questions. If you've tried something already, please add it to the question - if not, research and attempt your question first, and then come back. –  user647772 Sep 2 '12 at 8:49
    
I don't find anything strange here, but I suggest you 2 things. 1: trim the line (String line) that you want to compare with QUIT. 2: instead of using equals(...) use eqalsIgnoreCase(...). –  SAbbasizadeh Sep 2 '12 at 8:54
    
Thanks, I find it strange simply because I can't write tests for this. –  Can Lu Sep 2 '12 at 8:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You've done 90% of the work already, by placing the actual exiting code off in a separate class with no logic of its own. Your difficulty is caused by your use of a static method.

I would advise making the exitWhenQuitDetected not static. Put it in a class that you can instantiate when you need it, and that you can create with a mocked SystemExit. Something like this.

public class SomeClass{
  private final SystemExit exiter;
  private final static String QUIT = "quit";
  public SomeClass(){
    this(new SystemExit());
  }

  SomeClass(SystemExit exiter){
    this.exiter = exiter;
  }

  public static void exitWhenQuitDetected() {    
    String line = "";    
    try {    
      final InputStreamReader input = new InputStreamReader(System.in);    
      final BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader(input);    
      while (!(line.equals(QUIT))) {    
        line = in.readLine();    
        if (line.equals(QUIT)) {    
          System.out.println("You are now quiting the program");                      
          exiter.exit(1);    
        }    
      }    
    } catch (Exception e) {    
      System.err.println("Error: " + e.getMessage());    
    }    
  }       

  // ...
}

Then, in your test, you can make a mock of SystemExit, and use the package-private constructor of SomeClass to create an object that will use your mock as its exiter. You can then run your test, and verify on your mock SystemExit.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for a pragmatic answer requiring minimal changes. I still like my answer (no code changes) but then I'm biased :) –  Brad Sep 3 '12 at 11:06

You should include the PowerMockito Jars into your project rather than just vanilla Mockito. The Powermock library is designed for mocking Static and/or Final classes and methods.

The following this blog post contains example code describing a similar scenario to yours.

Essentially you require a test class similar to this...

@RunWith(PowerMockRunner.class)
@PrepareForTest({System.class, ClassToTest.class})
public class SystemExitTest {

    @Test
    public void shouldCallSystemExit() {

        PowerMockito.mockStatic(System.class);

        ClassToTest.methodToTest();

        PowerMockito.verifyStatic();

        System.exit(0);

        System.out.println("If this message displays them System.exit() was mocked successfully");
    }    
}

Given this simple implementation class...

public class ClassToTest {

    public static void methodToTest() {
        // do some stuff
        System.exit(0);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

There is no real way to test you SystemExit class since exercising it will cause the JVM to exit. You might be able to do something with a SecurityManager which detects and rejects the System.exit(), but that's going to be a whole lot of work to test a single line of code.

You've done the right thing - you've pulled the functionality into a small class. If I were you, I would put an interface on it and inject it via the interface into the parsing code. Then in your test you can inject a mock and test that your parsing code calls the exit() method on the mock with the right exit code.

The code in the SystemExit class is small and self-contained enough to look at and reason about without testing, IMHO.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks dty, agree with you I didn't want to test SystemExit either, I want to unit test method exitWhenQuitDetected, basically mock the SysytemExit, BufferedReader etc classes and verify the SystemExit.exit(0) method gets indeed called when seeing a "quit" input. –  Can Lu Sep 2 '12 at 9:06

Plenty of technical solutions were offered. I would like to point out another perspective:

This code should not really be unit tested.

The best gain you get out of unit tests is when applying them to complex business code, especially with a lot of branching.

In cases where the code is trivial, I would advise against writing unit tests around it since it simply just does not have a high enough return of investment. your case actually exacerbates my claim, think of the amount of effort it takes you to test simple code such as this and compare it with the gain.. does this really worth the effort. Does this really make you trust your own code more?

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, I +1'ed this because I thought the question was about the SystemExit class - which, as you say should not be tested. But the exitWhenQuitDetected method has a while and an if - so it should definitely be tested. The problem is that the method is static. I will post an answer shortly explaining how best to test this. –  David Wallace Sep 2 '12 at 22:03

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