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please pardon since I am a UNIX beginner.

I wanna write a shell script that can ask user type in the filename and output the number of lines in that file, here is my code:

echo "Pls enter your filename:"
read filename
result=wc -l $filename

echo "Your file has $result lines"

However, I couldn't get it working since it complains about the identifier "filename". Could experts help?Thanks !!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

That works fine, at least in bash. Well, the read works fine. However, the assignment to result should probably be:

result=$(wc -l $filename)

but, since that command outputs both the line count and the filename, you might want to change it a little to just get the line count, something like:

result=$(cat $filename | wc -l)

or:

result=$(wc -l <$filename)

The command you have:

result=wc -l $filename

will set result to the literal wc, then try to execute the -l command.

For example, the following five-line script:

#!/bin/bash
echo "Pls enter your filename:"
read filename
result=$(cat $filename | wc -l)
echo "Your file has $result lines"

will, when run and given its name as input, produce the following:

Your file has 5 lines

If you're not using bash, you need to specify which shell you are using. Different shells have different ways of doing things.

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2  
To get wc to print just the number, wc -l < $filename appears more elegant than cat –  glenn jackman Sep 2 '12 at 12:49
    
@glennjackman: You don't need the STDIN redirect -- wc -l $filename does the trick too :). –  jmdeldin Sep 3 '12 at 5:01
2  
@jmdeldin, the problem with the is the output of wc -l infile is 12345 infile - it contains the input file name as well. If you just want the number, you can post-process that with something like awk (another process), or remove the file name by using stdin (cat infile | wc ..., another process, or < infile at no extra processes). –  paxdiablo Sep 3 '12 at 5:21
    
@paxdiablo: Ah, thanks for the clarification. Mental shell scripting...not so effective. –  jmdeldin Sep 3 '12 at 5:25

If you want to evaluate wc -l $filename , you have t do:

result=$(wc -l $filename)

Otherwise, with result=wc -l $filename, bash will assign wc to result, and interpret the next word(-l) as a command to run.

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Here you go :

echo "Pls enter your filename:" 
read filename 
result=`wc -l $filename | tr -s " " | cut -f2 -d' '`

echo "Your file has $result lines"
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