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I have an User class, that has multiple properties inside it, and I also have addPoint method for User class, which allows user to input points into any of it's properties. However, there can be up to like 500 properties, everyone can have different ones, etc. So it would be a pain in the ass to code every property with "if: - elif:". Now this is what I tried to do, to make it much easier and cleaner:

class User:
    def __init__(self):
        self.health = 0
        self.speed = 0

    def addPoint(self, property, amount):
        eval("self."+property) = eval("self."+property) + amount

And now when I'd do fe.

u = User()
u.addPoint("health", 5)

I would like it to do this: self.health = self.health + 5, and that's what I used the eval()s for. However, Python's just giving me error: can't assign to function call. I'm not trying to assign the eval() function call itself, I'm trying to assign the returned value from eval(), so how could I do this the easiest way?

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As to the error: if you think about it, your example would evaluate to 0 = 0 + 5, since eval in line 7 returns a value, not a pointer or quote. –  phg Sep 2 '12 at 9:29

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Don't use eval(), use setattr() and getattr() instead:

setattr(self, property, getattr(self, property) + amount)
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Thank you sir, works and looks even better, will accept asap :) –  user1632861 Sep 2 '12 at 9:34

use a dictionary instead of eval():

class User:
    def __init__(self):
        self.health = 0
        self.speed = 0
        self.properties={}

    def addPoint(self, property, amount):
        self.properties[property] =self.properties.get(property,0)+amount 

        #self.properties.get(property,0) returns 0 if the property was not defined
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I'm not sure if it's best solution, but you can use dict attribute of object like this:

def addPoint(self, property, amount):
    self.__dict__[property] = amount

__dict__ attribute stores all attributes of object, and you can access them in very clean and simple way.

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Note that by going to the instance __dict__ you may be bypassing @property methods. –  Martijn Pieters Sep 2 '12 at 11:01

Use function settattr, provided by Python standard library - quick example:

>>> class A:
...     def __init__(self):
...         setattr(self, "a", "b")
... 
>>> A().a
'b'
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Martijn Pieters already mentioned that in his answer. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Sep 2 '12 at 9:31

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