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I have 2 functions:

public void WithdrawMoney()
{
    //Take money from bank account
    //Exceptions abort the operation and are printed
    //Rethrow exception if called by TransferMoney()
}

public void TransferMoney()
{
    //Take money from one account and only deposit on another account if no exceptions were caught in WithdrawMoney()
    WithdrawMoney(); 
    DepositMoney();     
}

What I want is to be able to rethrow an exception that occured in WithdrawMoney(), only if it was called by TransferMoney(). If I just want to withdraw money from an account, the exception must be handled, but does not have to be rethrown as it was not called by another method.

Besides working with bools, there is another solution that comes to my mind. I could look into the stacktrace, see if TransferMoney() called WithdrawMoney() and only rethrow the exception if it did. Or is there a way to see if an exception occured in a method?

I just want to know if you can check whether an exception is throwable in a catch block before throwing it. If I always throw it, the exception will be unhandled when I just call WithdrawMoney() directly.

share|improve this question
3  
"Rethrow exception if called by TransferMoney" reconsider your design. That doesn't sound like a good idea. –  CodesInChaos Sep 2 '12 at 10:26
    
I agree to CodesInChaos' suggestion - relying on exception to control your execturion flow is very bad idea. Consider changing your design. –  MaciekTalaska Sep 2 '12 at 10:27
1  
I think what you are after is Transaction and Rollback pattern, you better look into it instead of messing around with raw exceptions. As for your direct question the answer is no, there's no such property in Exception class, you will have to pass parameter to the function. –  Shadow Wizard Sep 2 '12 at 10:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Why exceptions?

Why wont you just let (possibly even both) methods return bool, indicating success?

It sounds like you had the bools idea, but didn't go for it for some reason. Why the heck not? It's so logical and simple!

Withdraw money handles inner exceptions and returns false, which the TransferMoney will check and return false as well. It is also very logical that you will want those operations to return whether the operation was successful.

public bool WithdrawMoney()
{
    //Take money from bank account

    //Exceptions abort the operation and are printed, and return false

    //Flawless run returns true
}

public bool TransferMoney()
{
    //Take money from one account and only deposit
    //    on another account if WidthdrawMoney returned true
    if (WithdrawMoney())
    {
        DepositMoney();     
        return true;
    }

    return false;
}

After all that - I would say that you also need to check the 2nd WithdrawMoney operation did not fail, and in case it did - rollback the changes you've done with the 1st WithdrawMoney.

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A method shouldn't behave differently because of some arbitrary condition that is hard to follow and document.

You should refactor out the part of the withdrawal method that you want to use internally, so that you get one method to use from the outside and one from the inside.

private void MakeWithdrawal() {
    //Take money from bank account
    //Exceptions abort the operation
}

public void WithdrawMoney()
{
    MakeWithdrawal();
    //Exceptions are printed
}

public void TransferMoney()
{
    //Take money from one account and only deposit on another account if no exceptions were caught in WithdrawMoney()
    MakeWithdrawal();
    DepositMoney();     
    //Exceptions are printed
}
share|improve this answer

Just add a wrapper. Single Responsible applies to methods too.

private void WithdrawMoney()
{
    // Take money from bank account

    // _Always_ Rethrow 
}

public void WithdrawMoneyPublic()
{
   // call WithdrawMoney and handle the exceptions
}
share|improve this answer

You can consider adding an optional parameter to your function call:

public void WithdrawMoney(bool throwOnError = false)
{
    //Do stuff
    catch(Exception ex)
    {
        if(throwOnError) throw;
    } 
    //Do stuff
}

public void TransferMoney()
{
    WithdrawMoney(true);
}

However, this is taken out of "Framework Design Guidelines" as an example of code you should not write. It is an excellent book.

share|improve this answer
    
Should not write? Then how is this an answer? –  Yorye Nathan Sep 2 '12 at 11:19
    
Framework design guidelines says that the callee is responsible for determining when exceptions get thrown and the caller determines how exceptions are handled. The question necessarily wants the caller to determine if an exception is thrown. I answered his question as best I could, while mentioning that it is fundamentally at odds with some book written. Is it really not an answer? How do you suggest I improve it? –  Jason Hermann Sep 2 '12 at 11:26
1  
I understand you better now. I would just phrase it more clearly. I suppose then even just adding a "But" or an "However" at the beginning of the last line would do it. –  Yorye Nathan Sep 2 '12 at 11:30
    
By the way, great guideline! :) –  Yorye Nathan Sep 2 '12 at 11:32

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