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I see Decorator DP examples, but all of them imply, that concrete object will be at the end of chain:

IProduct prod2 = new Sugar(new Sugar(new Sugar(new Milk(new DarkRoast()))));
Console.WriteLine("I am {0}, my cost is {1}", prod2.Name(), prod2.Cost());

DarkRoast is a concrete object, other object - is a decorators. So, I (or client) need to remember who is at the and of creation chain.

So, by default, I can not do:

IProduct prod2 = new Sugar(new DarkRoast(new Sugar(new Milk(new Sugar()))));
Console.WriteLine("I am {0}, my cost is {1}", prod2.Name(), prod2.Cost());

But, the meaning (I think) is same: Dark roast cofee + 3 sugar + 1 milk.

So, I redesign it to:

public interface IProduct {
    double Cost();
    string Name();
}

public class DarkRoast : IProduct {
    IProduct _product;

    public DarkRoast(IProduct prod = null) { _product = prod; }

    public double Cost() {
        if (_product != null) { return 2.5 + _product.Cost(); }
        else { return 2.5; }
    }

    public string Name() {
        if (_product != null) { return "DarkRoast " + _product.Name(); }
        else { return "DarkRoast "; }
    }
}

public class Milk : IProduct {
    IProduct _product;

    public Milk(IProduct prod = null) { _product = prod; }

    public double Cost() {
        if (_product != null) { return 0.5 + _product.Cost(); }
        else { return 0.5; }
    }

    public string Name() {
        if (_product != null) { return "With milk " + _product.Name(); }
        else { return "With milk "; }
    }
}

public class Sugar : IProduct {
    IProduct _product;

    public Sugar(IProduct prod = null) { _product = prod; }

    public double Cost() {
        if (_product != null) { return 0.2 + _product.Cost(); }
        else { return 0.2; }
    }

    public string Name() {
        if (_product != null) { return "With sugar " + _product.Name(); }
        else { return "With sugar "; }
    }
}

It is make me possible do

IProduct prod2 = new Sugar(new DarkRoast(new Sugar(new Milk(new Sugar()))));
Console.WriteLine("I am {0}, my cost is {1}", prod2.Name(), prod2.Cost());

So, I do not need to remember order of stuff. And, I think all stuff here is decorators (is it a bad idea?) What are disadvantages of these implementation?

share|improve this question
    
Well. It depends on the usage. The last console writeline suggests shopping? In that case it's not a good solution –  jgauffin Sep 3 '12 at 12:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This looks reasonable to me, but it might be slightly improved by adding a concrete Null Object used as the default delegate object and thus avoiding the null checks.

Modulo my knowledge of your language syntax (it's a language I don't actually use), this would look something like this:

public class Empty : IProduct
{

    public double Cost()
    {
        return 0.0;
    }

    public string Name()
    {
        return "";
    }
}


public class Sugar : IProduct
{
    IProduct _product;


    public Sugar(IProduct prod = null) 
    {  
        _product = (prod == null) ? new Empty() : prod;
    }

    public double Cost()
    {
        return 0.2 + _product.Cost();
    }

    public string Name()
    {
        return "With sugar " + _product.Name();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for new for me Null Object DP!!! –  zzfima Sep 2 '12 at 14:05
    
A little fix: you can not do : IProduct prod = new Empty() You need to do: public DarkRoast(IProduct prod = null) { _product = (prod == null) ? new Empty() : prod; } –  zzfima Sep 2 '12 at 14:11
    
@zzfima Thanks, I thought that might be needed, but not really knowing the language, didn't do it. I'll change it now. –  Don Roby Sep 2 '12 at 14:16
    
But, do you think is a good approach (my design)??? –  zzfima Sep 2 '12 at 18:16
1  
I think it's perfectly reasonable. –  Don Roby Sep 2 '12 at 18:25

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