Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

consider the code bleow:

-module(add_two).
-compile(export_all).

start()->
    process_flag(trap_exit, true),
    Pid = spawn_link(add_two, loop, []),
    register(add_two, Pid),
    ok.

request()->
    add_two ! bad,
    receive
        {'EXIT', _Pid, Reason} -> io:format("self:~w~n", [{error, Reason}]);
        {Result}               -> io:format("result:~w~n", [Result])
    after
        1000->timeout
    end.

loop()->
    receive
        bad                 -> exit(nogoodreason_bad);
        {request, Pid, Msg} -> Pid ! {result, Msg + 2}
    end,
    loop().

when I test the code above in shell,I get two different results with different input order,but why?

first input order :

Eshell V5.9.1  (abort with ^G)
1> add_two:request(ddd).
** exception error: undefined function add_two:request/1
2> add_two:start().
ok
3> add_two:request(). 
self:{error,nogoodreason_bad}
ok

second input order:

Eshell V5.9.1  (abort with ^G)
1> add_two:start().
ok
2> add_two:request(ddd).
** exception error: undefined function add_two:request/1
3> add_two:request().
** exception error: bad argument
     in function  add_two:request/0 (add_two.erl, line 11)
share|improve this question
    
Code that is completely devoid of whitespace and indented haphazardly is very difficult to read. I've cleaned things up for you in this instance. Please follow suit in future. –  Marcelo Cantos Sep 2 '12 at 13:53
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The call add_two:request(ddd) makes the shell process die, taking add_two down with it, due to the spawn_link() call. You can confirm this by checking the shell's pid before and after an exception. It doesn't even have to involve the add_two module:

12> self().
<0.61.0>
13> 2+2.
4
14> self().
<0.61.0>
15> 1/0.
** exception error: bad argument in an arithmetic expression
     in operator  '/'/2
        called as 1 / 0
16> self().
<0.69.0>
17> 

You can avoid this effect either by calling spawn instead of spawn_link, or trapping and handling exits in the spawned process.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot!!! –  hu wang Sep 2 '12 at 14:39
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.