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I have an application I am developing that deploys a JAX-WS web service using the com.sun.xml.ws.transport.http.servlet.WSSpringServlet (the JAX-WS RI Spring plugin). The application is being setup to have the endpoint class (annotated with @WebService) make calls to one or more services which in turn make calls to DAOs.

It seem that autowiring of beans works in the endpoint class to pull in my service layer, but anything in the service layer annotated with @Autowired isn't working to pull in the DAOs. I'm not loading a Spring DisptacherServlet since I'm not hosting any other web content using this application only a ContextLoaderListener and the WSSpringServlet.

It there any way I can make autowiring work across all of my classes within the application? Or, is there a different way I should consider deploying my web service?

Additionally, this seems to be an issue that would apply in other situations as well when you are using Spring without loading a DispatcherServlet. For example using the Spring-Quartz integration. Although I haven't tried to do autowiring with a Spring managed Quartz job.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

So, after much research (and hair pulling on my part) the whole issue seems to have come down to not being a PICNIC. Essentially early on in development I had put a line of code for testing that simply created in instance of my Service inline instead of wiring it in. Obviously therefore Spring wasn't managing my class to autowire anything in. Removing the inline instantiation and using the autowired instance fixed the issue.

  *facepalm*
  *facepalm*
  *facepalm*
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