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edit: On odd change that someone is reading this, I'd like to add one last thing. Assuming that the three values in question are already in memory and they are not changed, I've counted no less than 14 instructions to be able to achieve this feat.

I's very much like this confirmed if anyone can.

[top edit end]

The problem is simple. I have three integer values and I need to find the largest and the smallest. By largest I mean not smallest or in between and vice versa.

As I was unable to find a "quality solution" online, I had to make my own attempt.

if(a > b) {
  if(a > c) {
    high = a;
    if(b > c) {
      low = c;
    }
    else {
      low = b;
    }
  }
  else {
    if(b > c) {
      high = b;
      low = c;
    }
    else {
      high = c;
      low = b;
    }
  }
}
else if(a > c) {
  if(b > c) {
    high = b;
    low = c;
  }
  else {
    high = c;
    low = b;
  }
}
else {
  low = a;
  if(b > c) {
    high = b;
  }
  else {
    high = c;
  }
}

Assuming I have not made any mistakes, this should solve the problem using three conditionals.

Assuming it works as intended, I'm rather pleased with my effort actually, however my intention was to find the most efficient algorithm, thus I ask you now what that is.

Best regards.

Edit: I've reviewed the solutions proposed so far and they're all nice.

My favorite so far.

if(a>b) {
  max = a;
  min = b;
}
else {
  max = b;
  min = a;
}
if(c>max)
  max = c
else if(c< min)
  min = c

2-3 sigments and 2-3 conditionals, if I'm not mistaken. That's impressive.

small revision of the above, using 'a' as alias for 'min'.

if(a>b) {
  max = a;
  a = b;
}
else {
  max = b;
}
if(c>max)
  max = c
else if(c< a)
  a = c

If only there was an easy way to exchange variables... Well, the only thing I can think of is that could eliminate the need for 'max', at least in C and C derivatives, certainly wouldn't be efficient, other than in terms of memory use, and I can affort to spend an extra 4 bytes. ;)

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2  
"however my intention was to find the most efficient algorithm" Most efficient in terms of what? Least memory used? Fastest average execution time? Fastest worst case execution time? Least comparisons? Fewest lines of code? –  Mark Byers Sep 2 '12 at 14:58
1  
For what input does this run with only two conditionals? –  Deestan Sep 2 '12 at 15:06
    
My mistake, there is not scenario with only two conditionals. As for what I mean by most efficient... Maybe I should've used the word "clever" instead. I might say from a mathematically point of view, involving fewest steps or the most elegant solution. –  Zacariaz Sep 2 '12 at 15:09

8 Answers 8

up vote 2 down vote accepted
def min_max(a, b, c):
    if a > b:
        min, max = b, a   # two assignments
    else:
        min, max = a, b   # ditto

    if c > max:
        max = c
    elif c < min:
        min = c

    return (min, max)
share|improve this answer
    
Same approach as my earlier favorite, only more clever with the assignments. Thanks –  Zacariaz Sep 2 '12 at 16:10

Since you only have 3 I would use something like:

Maximum = max(a, max(b,c))
Minimum = min(a, min(b,c))

I'm not exactly sure what language you are using, but most every language has a max function, built-in or easily accessible.

share|improve this answer
    
If you define the phrase, "my intention was to find the most efficient algorithm" as meaning "the fewest comparisons" than sure. I thought he meant shortest code length and least complex. –  mjgpy3 Sep 2 '12 at 14:54
    
I like this one because it's easy to understand. So unless this is for some kind of a realtime embedded software - I think this would be the best option –  Gir Sep 2 '12 at 14:56
    
It's concise and easy to understand, but it uses 4 compares, whereas only 3 are really needed. –  Paul R Sep 2 '12 at 15:07
    
The problem with this approach is that the functions are not described. In theory the min and max functions may be incredible inefficient, one wouldn't necessarily know. Other than that it's a very nice practical approach. –  Zacariaz Sep 2 '12 at 15:19

Perhaps

 highest = a; lowest = a;
 if (b>a)
 {
     highest = b;
 }
 else
 {
     lowest = b;
 }
 if (c>highest)
 {
     highest = c;
 }
 else
 {
     if (c<lowest)
     {
         lowest = c;
     }
 }
share|improve this answer
    
isn't there something wrong with this? –  Zacariaz Sep 2 '12 at 15:24
    
Only a copy and paste error. –  podiluska Sep 2 '12 at 15:51
    
I assumed as much. Clever solution. –  Zacariaz Sep 2 '12 at 16:18
if(a>b){swap(a,b);    /* in other words: a=a^b;b=a^b;a=a^b; */}
if(a>c){swap(a,c);    /*in other words: a=a^c;c=a^c;a=a^c;  */}
if(b>c){swap(b,c);    /*in other words: b=b^c;c=b^c;b=b^c;  */}
//now a is the smallest, c is the largest, but names are changed
high=c;
low=a;

If you are desperate,

void swap(int & x, int & y)  //<--- yes it needs to be pass by reference
{
    __asm
    {
       movaps xmm5,[x]
       movaps xmm6,[y]   
       movaps [x],xmm6
       movaps [y],xmm5   //i cant say anything without trying ^^
    }

    return;

}

Only 3 comparisons=less cpu mis-branch predictions and total loop instruction will be small enough to fit in a cpu-loop-cache(decoded-inst. cache)

share|improve this answer
2  
Good - but the XOR swap gimmick is not only evil but also quite inefficient. –  Paul R Sep 2 '12 at 15:04
    
I know :) , just added to fill the empty area. Could have used SIMD in a __asm{} also(maybe xchg is enough). Yes you are right but this is efficient in terms of space i think :) –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Sep 2 '12 at 15:09
    
Hadn't thought of this. Essentially the same thing I'm doing, except this is, as already mentioned, quite inefficient. ;) –  Zacariaz Sep 2 '12 at 15:12
    
Oh my, when people start with assembly, then I know I'm in trouble. :D –  Zacariaz Sep 2 '12 at 15:33
    
Just use a built-in function instead of swap() because could be already-optimized. –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Sep 2 '12 at 15:35

This uses 3 comparisons and 3 or 4 assignments.

min = max = a;

if a < b
    max = b
else
    min = b

if b < c
    if c > a:
        max = c
else
    if c < a:
        min = c
share|improve this answer
    
Quite clever and with only two extra assignments. –  Zacariaz Sep 2 '12 at 15:14

This solution uses between 2 to 3 comparisons.

The return value is the couple (min, max).

  • Pick 2 numbers of the 3 given numbers.
  • Compare them, and lets call the smaller one a and the larger one b.
  • Lets call the number that wasn't picked c.
  • If c>=b then return (a, c).
  • If c>=a then return (a, b).
  • return (c, b).
share|improve this answer
    
I must admit this confuses me. –  Zacariaz Sep 2 '12 at 16:13
    
I will edit the answer. –  Avi Cohen Sep 2 '12 at 20:55

A computed/enumerated switch should give the compiler enough freedom to minimalise the amount of (conditional) jumps:

#include <stdio.h>

static inline void minmax3(int*themin,int*themax, int a, int b, int c)
{
switch(
          1 * (a>b)
        + 2 * (a>c)
        + 4 * (c>b)
        ) {
        case 0: *themin = a; *themax = b; break;
        case 1: *themin = b; *themax = a; break;
        case 2: *themin = c; *themax = b; break;
        case 3: *themin = b; *themax = a; break;
        case 4: *themin = a; *themax = c; break;
        case 5: *themin = b; *themax = c; break;
        case 6: *themin = b; *themax = c; break;
        case 7: *themin = b; *themax = a; break;
        }
return ;
}

int main(void)
{
int a,b,c,mi,ma;

for (a=0; a <3; a++) {
        for (b=0; b <3; b++) {
                for (c=0; c <3; c++) {

                        minmax3( &mi, &ma, a, b, c);
                        printf("a=%d b=%d c=%d min=%d max=%d\n"
                        , a, b, c, mi, ma
                        );
        }}}
return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
if(a>=b)
 {if(a>=c)
   {MAX=a;
    MIN=c;
    if(c>=b)
     MIN=b;
     }
  else
   MAX=c,MIN=b;
 }
else
{if(b>=c)
   {MAX=b;
    MIN=c
    if(c>=a)
     MIN=a;
     }
  else
   MAX=c,MIN=a;
 }
share|improve this answer

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