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A simple example:

      class Account{
           private String account_name;
           private String password;
           private double balance;

           public synchronized double getBalance(){
                  return balance;
           }
           public synchronized void setBalance(double add){
                  balance += add;
           }
      }

From my understanding that acquiring the lock associated with an object does not prevent other threads from accessing that object. They have to be the same lock to prevent accessing.

So if two person tried accessing the same account at different ATM, then it will create two different instances of this Account object, correct ? so then it's not guarded with the same lock, right ?

lets say if Person A (Thread A) tried to save money into the account while at the same time Person B(Thread B) tried getting to total balance of the account.

How does it work ? Do they cache the Account while be using so it will return the same Account object when the next request comes in ?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Synchronized methods will lock the object instance. However, if there is a method, which is not synchronized concurrent access can happen.

ATM machines don't access your account - the bank server does. The ATM machine is just a client. So accessing the same account from 2 different ATMs would be guarded by the bank server, which has only one instance of this account in it's memory / database (probably protected by some locking mechanism and not written in Java).

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2  
Although I'm betting that his is an academic exercise, and so likely the locking will be the responsibility of his server code. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Sep 2 '12 at 15:08

From my understanding that acquiring the lock associated with an object does not prevent other threads from accessing that object. They have to be the same lock to prevent accessing.

Correct. If multiple threads attempt to acquire a simple lock, then only on will be allowed to proceed. Locks do not necessarily need to be associated with a single object though. You can creates locks for other tasks as well.

So if two person tried accessing the same account at different ATM, then it will create two different instances of this Account object, correct ? so then it's not guarded with the same lock, right ? lets say if Person A (Thread A) tried to save money into the account while at the same time Person B(Thread B) tried getting to total balance of the account. How does it work ? Do they cache the Account while be using so it will return the same Account object when the next request comes in ?

Sort of, what you're describing is a distributed locking scenario, which is quite different. As somebody already mentioned, the ATM will send the transaction back for processing at the bank, and the servers there will handle concurrency issues.

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what do you mean 'Locks do not necessarily need to be associated with a single object' ? –  user1389813 Sep 2 '12 at 18:19
    
By convention, you can associate several objects with a lock. For example, you could associate an action with a lock, and that action may end up modifying several objects. –  Bill Sep 2 '12 at 23:00
    
Are you saying put a lock on one of the state variable, and modifying other state variables within that lock block ? –  user1389813 Sep 2 '12 at 23:14
    
More or less. It's risky business, because you have to make sure that all of your code follows your locking conventions. Which is true no matter what when you use locks to manage concurrent code. There are higher level facilities that are safer to use. Check out concurrency mechanisms in either Clojure or Erlang for more information. –  Bill Sep 3 '12 at 4:13

My best guess is they are using a object pool like cache and when ever request comes it will search particular object(Account) exist in the pool by using some unique identifier like account number. If it exist reference will be returned. Other wise it will be loaded from persistent datasource to the pool and new reference will be created and returned. So even two users(threads) try to access it sametime. Server will not create two instances for each of them.

Secondly if there are multiple synchronzied methods with in a class and if a thread is currently executing inside a synchronized method all the other threads trying to access any synchronized method for same object will be blocked(suspended execution) until first thread exists the synchronized method.

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It depends on the way the system is implemented. Usually you have instances of a class and each instance has an implicit lock associated with it OR you can create a simple

private Object lock;

and then everyone (be it ATM or a bank employee or something else) MUST explicitly acquire this lock. At the end of the day it boils down how the system is designed and implemented - locking primitives are just that - primitives. It is up to the designer/implemented to make use of the and to utilize them appropriately in EVERY component - consistent locking. Furthermore in this case I'd go for an atomic double and save the trouble of acquiring a potentially heavy object lock.

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