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I have installed Apache Cassandra on the remote Ubuntu server. How to allow remote access for an Apache Cassandra database? And how to make a connection?

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1 Answer 1

Remote access to Cassandra is via its thrift port (although note that the JMX port can be used to perform some limited operations).

The thrift port is defined in cassandra.yaml by the rpc_port parameter, which defaults to 9160. Your cassandra node should be bound to the IP address of your server's network card - it shouldn't be 127.0.0.1 or localhost which is the loopback interface's IP, binding to this will prevent direct remote access. You configure the bound address with the rpc_address parameter in cassandra.yaml. Setting this to 0.0.0.0 says "listen on all network interfaces" which may or may not be suitable for you.

To make a connection you can use:

  • The cassandra-cli in the cassandra distribution's bin directory provides simple get / set / list operations and depends on Java
  • The cqlsh shell which provides CQL access to cassandra, this depends on Python
  • A higher level interface such as Apollo
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Connection refused :( Even when i try to telnet my server on port 9160... –  user1588782 Sep 3 '12 at 7:17
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Can you run these commands: ps -ef | grep CassandraDaemon ; netstat -lntp | grep <pid from above command> This will show what IP / port combo(s) your cassandra is listening on. As an aside, try to avoid telneting to the thrift port - passing in any non thrift data can lead to OutOfMemory situations (it's quite a nasty 'feature' - to test & confirm this, telnet to the thrift port type in random text, hit return, then monitor memory usage of the CassandraDaemon pid over the next few mins). –  CraigJPerry Sep 3 '12 at 20:58
    
Note that Cassandra is robust to random garbage on the Thrift port since version 0.7.0 two years ago. –  jbellis Sep 4 '12 at 17:36
    
Ahh ok, yeah you're right - i just tried there on a v1.1-0 instance (while [1]; do nc 127.0.0.1 9168 < /mach_kernel; done) even after 2Gb of binary data, heap usage doesn't go above 240Mb for me. I feel a bit daft now for having been perpetuating a falsehood! I live and learn :-) (p.s. great product Mr Bellis) –  CraigJPerry Sep 5 '12 at 0:33
    
tcp 0 0 0.0.0.0:57621 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN 8536/java tcp 0 0 0.0.0.0:7000 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN 8536/java tcp 0 0 0.0.0.0:7199 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN 8536/java tcp 0 0 0.0.0.0:47684 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN 8536/java tcp 0 0 127.0.0.1:9160 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN 8536/java –  user1588782 Sep 6 '12 at 7:35

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