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I have a data.table and I need to extract equal length segments starting at various row locations. What is the easiest way to do this? For example:

x <- data.table(a=sample(1:1000,100), b=sample(1:1000,100))
r <- c(1,2,10,20,44)
idx <- lapply(r, function(i) {j <-which(x$a == i); if (length(j)>0) {return(j)} })
y <- lapply(idx, function(i) {if (!is.null(i)) x[i:(i+5)]})
do.call(rbind, y)
    a   b
1:  44  63
2:  96 730
3: 901 617
4: 446 370
5: 195 341
6: 298 411

This is certainly not the data.table way of doing things so I was hoping there is a better way?

EDIT: Per comments below, I edit this just so it's clear that the values in a are not necessarily contiguous nor do they correspond to the row number.

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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Not sure whether you already know the row positions, or if you want to search for them. Either way, this should cover both.

require(data.table)
set.seed(1)
DT = data.table(a=sample(1:1000,20), b=sample(1:1000,20))
setkey(DT,a)
DT
#       a   b
#  1:  62 338
#  2: 175 593
#  3: 201 267
#  4: 204 478
#  5: 266 935
#  6: 372 212
#  7: 374 711
#  8: 380 184
#  9: 491 659
# 10: 572 651
# 11: 625 863
# 12: 657 380
# 13: 679 488
# 14: 707 782
# 15: 760 816
# 16: 763 404
# 17: 894 385
# 18: 906 126
# 19: 940  14
# 20: 976 107
r = c(201,380,760)
starts = DT[J(r),which=TRUE]  # binary search for items
                              # skip if the starting row numbers are known
starts
# [1]  3  8 15

Option 1: make the row number sequences, concatenate, and do one lookup in DT (no need for keys or binary search just to select by row numbers) :

DT[unlist(lapply(starts,seq.int,length=5))]
#       a   b
#  1: 201 267
#  2: 204 478
#  3: 266 935
#  4: 372 212
#  5: 374 711
#  6: 380 184
#  7: 491 659
#  8: 572 651
#  9: 625 863
# 10: 657 380
# 11: 760 816
# 12: 763 404
# 13: 894 385
# 14: 906 126
# 15: 940  14

Option 2: make a list of data.table subsets and then rbind them together. This is less efficient than option 1, but for completeness :

L = lapply(starts,function(i)DT[seq.int(i,i+4)])
L
# [[1]]
#      a   b
# 1: 201 267
# 2: 204 478
# 3: 266 935
# 4: 372 212
# 5: 374 711
# 
# [[2]]
#      a   b
# 1: 380 184
# 2: 491 659
# 3: 572 651
# 4: 625 863
# 5: 657 380
# 
# [[3]]
#      a   b
# 1: 760 816
# 2: 763 404
# 3: 894 385
# 4: 906 126
# 5: 940  14 


rbindlist(L)   # more efficient that do.call("rbind",L). See ?rbindlist.
#       a   b
#  1: 201 267
#  2: 204 478
#  3: 266 935
#  4: 372 212
#  5: 374 711
#  6: 380 184
#  7: 491 659
#  8: 572 651
#  9: 625 863
# 10: 657 380
# 11: 760 816
# 12: 763 404
# 13: 894 385
# 14: 906 126
# 15: 940  14
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which is what i was looking for! thanks! –  Alex Sep 2 '12 at 23:14
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I think that this should be a better way and according to the 10 minute introduction to data.table, that's a binary search and therefore preferable:

library(data.table)
x <- data.table(a=1:100, b=1:100, key="a")
r <- c(1,2,10,20,44)
vec <- numeric()
for (elem in r) {
  vec <- c(vec, seq(from=elem, by=1, length.out=6))
}
x[data.table(vec)]
     a  b
 1:  1  1
 2:  2  2
 3:  3  3
 4:  4  4
 5:  5  5
 6:  6  6
 7:  2  2
...

Note that I first set column a as the key and then create an inner data.table to join with that column a. The creation of vec is probably not the best way, but that shouldn't be the bottleneck.

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i should have made the example more realistic, your solutions seems to work only if the data.table is literally what is above. mine doesn't have a values 1:10 but really goes something like 2,3,4,293,203,42. i'll correct the exampe –  Alex Sep 2 '12 at 16:18
    
@Alex Why can't you just add a column with with integers ranging from 1 to nrow(x)? –  Christoph_J Sep 2 '12 at 17:30
    
yes, this is possible but i wanted to avoid doing this since i have a bunch of groups so i would have to add the row numbers to each group –  Alex Sep 2 '12 at 18:20
    
if nobody can think of something else, then that would definitely be the solution of choice but i was hoping there is an easier way to get at this –  Alex Sep 2 '12 at 18:20
    
That c() inside the for() is going to be growing vec, so won't scale. –  Matt Dowle Sep 2 '12 at 21:42
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