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What's the correct place to check for HTTP Requests ? In controller, class constructor or method ? Is there a standard way to do this ? OOP-Tutorials are VERY diffenrent when it comes to handle GET/POST/etc ...

Example #1 (http request check in constructor, results in messy constructor )

class xxx {

    public function _construct() {

        if (isset($_GET["action"]) && $_GET["action"]=="logout") {
            $this->doLogout();  
        }
    }
}

Example #2 (http request check in method, results in what-the-hell-happens-here constructor)

class xxx {

    public function _construct() {
            $this->doLogout();
    }


    public function doLogout() {  

        if (isset($_GET["action"]) && $_GET["action"]=="logout") {
            $_SESSION = array();
            session_destroy();
        }        
    }
}

No Example #3 because you know what I mean ;)

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In CakePHP for instance the request's being checked in the controller and specifically in the action... Kinda makes sense I think. –  Havelock Sep 2 '12 at 15:23
    
Most frameworks check in controller, but you can check in the constructor/init method or your action depending on what you need. If you have a separate ajax action, that's where you're going to check the headers (of course). basically: there is no definitive answer, just look at how many times you need to check the requests, and look what works best for you –  Elias Van Ootegem Sep 2 '12 at 15:25
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1 Answer 1

I would say the cleanest way would be to have a router component. Make it act on an object generated from the server variabels (see symfony httpfoundation or zend http, this makes the router and full stack easily testable) and return to which controller and which method to send your request. If some of your methods have very specialized requirements to be called, put an intermediate controller method in between to route to the right method.

If you have a front controller or a main application class, that would be a good point to call it from.

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