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Anyone here experienced in HTML newsletter email crafting process? I wonder how you guys code the markup and CSS so that the email clients automatically choose the HTML version instead of plain text version.

I tried myself to code one custom HTML newsletter email but when it arrived to email clients like Gmail, Yahoo Mail & Hotmail, there was a link above the content 'Show Images' / 'Display Images'.

How to get rid of this issues so that the email clients automatically choose the HTML version and hide the 'Show Images' / 'Display Images' link above the content.

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3 Answers 3

The client is already displaying the HTML version.
However, for security reasons, most mail clients will not display images unless the user clicks that link.

There is nothing you can do about that.

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Those security reasons being the leak of privacy information that would occur by recording the viewing of the (potentially unique) image URL in the logs of the webserver. –  Quentin Sep 2 '12 at 15:34
    
Also email clients dont support HTML and CSS like browsers do, they support only a small set of actual specification. I go for using tables + images with alt texts for most email templates. –  sabithpocker Sep 2 '12 at 15:50
    
Thank you guys. Gmail Web showing 'Show Images' / 'Display Images' link. But in my Sparrow, the mail automatically show the HTML version. –  zulhfreelancer Sep 4 '12 at 6:02
    
@zulhfreelancer: Gmail is also displaying the HTML version. Sparrow either doesn't have this security feature or has been configured not to use it. –  SLaks Sep 4 '12 at 17:07

The recipient, not the sender, is responsible for choosing his or her preferred format if several are available. If you don't want to offer text/plain, then don't; but also understand that this may upset and/or alienate some recipients. For some, a disability may make (especially complex) HTML completely useless; for others, it may be merely a matter of focusing on content over presentation.

Concur with the observation that in this case, what you are looking at is apparently the HTML version with image loading disabled, though. Adding the images as attachments could help avoid this problem with some clients, but not others, and could land you in different kinds of trouble (too large messages and/or general waste of bandwidth).

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Sometimes, by putting attachments in the mail could help. My opinion, this method looks traditional and not professional at all. If there another method to eliminate the attachments and at the same time showing all the images, that is better. What do you think? –  zulhfreelancer Sep 4 '12 at 6:04
    
Mark the images as Content-Disposition: inline and/or link them with a cid: link from the HTML view. I fail to see how this would be "not professional at all"; in most clients, the experience is quite similar to viewing a web page direcly. Of course, just sending a link to a web page is also a workaround, but much less professional IMHO. –  tripleee Sep 4 '12 at 6:09

Recipient decides on what he receives.

It is best practice to ensure that you provide appropriate fall back so even when the images are not showing people can still somewhat read the email.

font styles, alt tags matching the text of image and also the title for image

e.g.

<td bgcolor="#000000">
  <font style="color:#ff0000; font-size:25px">
     <img src="title.jpg" alt="MY TITLE TEXT" title="MY TITLE TEXT">
  </font>
</td>

This should help you more in detail

http://www.campaignmonitor.com/blog/post/3574/

And try to slice the design to in a way it can still show the image shapes e.g.

http://www.campaignmonitor.com/blog/post/3642/email-with-pixel-art-fallback-when-images-are-blocked

http://emailfail.posterous.com/pizza-express-have-fun-with-images-off

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Thanks MonteCristo ! :) –  zulhfreelancer Oct 29 '12 at 13:38

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