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I've got this program in MIPS assembly which comes from a C code that does the simple average of the eigth arguments of the function.

average8:
    addu $4,$4,$5
    addu $4,$4,$6
    addu $4,$4,$7
    lw $2,16($sp)
    #nop
    addu $4,$4,$2
    lw $2,20($sp)
    #nop
    addu $4,$4,$2
    lw $2,24($sp)
    #nop
    addu $4,$4,$2
    lw $2,28($sp)
    #nop
    addu $2,$4,$2
    bgez $2,$L2
    addu $2,$2,7
$L2:
    sra $2,$2,3
    j $31

When the number is positve, we directly divided by 8 (shift by 3 bits), but when the number is negative, we first addu 7 then do the division.

My question is why do we add 7 to $2 when $2 is not >= 0 ?


EDIT : Here is the C code :

int average8(int x1, int x2, int x3, int x4, int x5, int x6, int x7, int x8)
{
    return (x1 + x2 + x3 + x4 + x5 + x6 + x7 + x8) / 8;
}

note : the possible loss in the division since we are using ints instead of floats or doubles is not important in this case.

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1  
I recommend posting the c code as well. –  Owen Sep 2 '12 at 15:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The difference appears to be accounting for the different behaviors of / 8 and >> 3 when negative numbers are involved:

int main() {
    printf("%d\n", (-50) / 8);
    printf("%d\n", (-50) >> 3);
    printf("%d\n", (-50 + 7) >> 3);
}

gives

-6
-7
-6

So, the compiler wants to use the >> 3 optimization, but it's not exactly the same as / 8, so it adds some code to correct for it.

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Seems like when ever you want to right shift negative numbers you have to add 2^(rightShift) -1 to the number in order to have the good rounding on the number –  Hugo Dozois Sep 2 '12 at 17:07

After seeing Owen's answer here's an addition to his answer, that explains the difference at the binary level :

The problem with the rounding happens at the binary level :

50; // 0011 0010
50 >> 3 // 0000 0110 which is 6

-50;  // 1100 1110
-50 >> 3; // 1111 1001 -> which is -7

Thus, to correct the issue, we have to had 2E(rightShift -1) to the number to correct the rounding problem.

-50 + 7; // 1101 0101
-43 >> 3; // 1111 1010 -> which is -6 (and this is what was expected)

But what if the number can be divided by 8 already? Well there will be no problem!

-32; // 1110 0000
-32 >> 3; // 1111 1100 -> which is -4 (that's already the good answer)

-32+7; // 1110 0111
-25 >> 3; // 1111 1100 -> which is still -4. 

Note that adding 7 to the answer when a number can be divided by 8 doesn't change any of the 3 LSB, thus the right logical shift of 3 stays unchanged.

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