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class Monad m => MonadState s m | m -> s where
    -- | Return the state from the internals of the monad.
    get :: m s
    get = state (\s -> (s, s))

    -- | Replace the state inside the monad.
    put :: s -> m ()
    put s = state (\_ -> ((), s))

    -- | Embed a simple state action into the monad.
    state :: (s -> (a, s)) -> m a
    state f = do
      s <- get
      let ~(a, s') = f s
      put s'
      return a

instance MonadState s m => MonadState s (MaybeT m) where...

Why does a instance of MonadState need a state and a monad, why not create a single parameter State class?

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4  
I'm not sure I understand the alternative you're suggesting. How would you write the type of state :: (s -> (a, s)) -> m a without both m and s? –  Owen Sep 2 '12 at 17:07
    
let say we would start from class MonadState s where... and we just do get :: s and put :: s -> () without putting s in a monad? Could it achieve a simpler state implementation where we do not have to worry about if it is a Maybe state or a Either state or a IO state? –  Gert Cuykens Sep 2 '12 at 17:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Let me try and answer Gert's question in the comments, because it's a pretty different question.

The question is, why can we not just write

class State s where
   get :: s
   put :: s -> ()

Well, we could write this. But now the question is, what can we do with it? And the hard part is, if we have some code with put x and then later get, how do we link the get to the put so that the same value is returned as the one put in?

And the problem is, with just the types () and s, there is no way to link one to the other. You can try implementing it in various ways, but it won't work. There's just no way to carry the data from the put to the get (maybe someone can explain this better, but the best way to understand is to try writing it).

A Monad is not necessarily the only way to make operations linkable, but it is a way, because it has the >> operator to link two statements together:

(>>) :: m a -> m b -> m b

so we can write

(put x) >> get

EDIT: Here is an example using the StateT instance defined in the package

foo :: StateT Int IO ()
foo = do
    put 3
    x <- get
    lift $ print x

main = evalStateT foo 0
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can you add a IO example to your answer? Like (put x) >> get >>= (\x -> print x) or something? –  Gert Cuykens Sep 2 '12 at 19:43
1  
@GertCuykens I can't think how to do it with IO; IO doesn't have a place to put state like State does. But I can add an example using StateT around IO. –  Owen Sep 2 '12 at 23:21
    
@Owen - you can make an example using just IO with IORef. –  John L Sep 3 '12 at 1:28
    
@JohnL That's what I was hoping to do, but I couldn't figure it out. Care to give on? –  Owen Sep 3 '12 at 1:53
1  
@Owen: gist.github.com/3616775 - the test functions demonstrate some usage, and also show one manifestation of unsound-ness. It also suffers from problems common with imperative code. But otherwise I suppose it does work. –  John L Sep 4 '12 at 5:05

You need some way of associating the type of the state to the type of the monad. MultiParamTypeClasses with FunctionalDependencies is one way. However, you can also do it using TypeFamilies.

class (Monad m) => MonadState m where
    type StateType m

    -- | Return the state from the internals of the monad.
    get :: m (StateType m)
    get = state (\s -> (s, s))

    -- | Replace the state inside the monad.
    put :: StateType m -> m ()
    put s = state (\_ -> ((), s))

    -- | Embed a simple state action into the monad.
    state :: (StateType m -> (a, StateType m)) -> m a
    state f = do
      s <- get
      let ~(a, s') = f s
      put s'
      return a

instance MonadState m => MonadState (MaybeT m) where
    type StateType (MaybeT m) = StateType m

    ...

This is the approach taken by the monads-tf package.

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1  
Note: monads-tf is basically retired. Originally, Ross split mtl up into transformers which was Haskell 98 and two packages monads-tf and monads-fd so people could choose which style they preferred. However, this was terrible as it split the community 3 ways, as mtl, monads-tf and monads-fd all used the same module names! The fix was to retire the old mtl, and make monads-fd into mtl and let monads-tf die. I wouldn't object to a package with the classes from monads-tf that was off to the side using different module names but, as it stands, it is downright detrimental. –  Edward Kmett Sep 6 '12 at 0:18

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