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I have the following code:

for(n in 1:1000){
    ..............
}

This will run ............ 1000 times. I havent put the full code in because its extremely long and not relevant to the answer

My question is there any way i can get the code to run until it reaches a specified convergence value to four decimal places. There are initial values being fed into this equation which generates new values and the process is continually iterative until a convergence attained (as specified above).

EDIT

I have a set of 4 values at the end of my code with different labels (A, B, C, D). Within my code there are two separate functions when each calculate different values and feed each other. So when i say convergence, i mean that when function 1 tells function 2 specific values and it calculates new values for A, B, C and D and the cycle continues and the next time these values are the same in as calculated by function 2

The key question im asking here is what format the code should take (the below would suggest that repeat is perferrable) and how to code the convergence criteria correctly as the assignment notation for successive iterations will be the same.

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2  
What's converging? The values of x and y aren't changing in this example, so the value of (x-2)^2+(y-3)^2 won't change. (You say that the initial values being fed in change, but do the values change inside the loop?) –  David Robinson Sep 2 '12 at 17:30
1  
You may possibly want to have a look at ?optim –  nico Sep 2 '12 at 17:31
    
@DavidRobinson The code is really irrelevant here. i just stuck in something basic. my code is vast but im simply asking if its possible to have R still running when it hits a particular specified convergence and what the general format of this is. –  user1642166 Sep 2 '12 at 17:33
1  
would a while loop be better suited for this job? Or put a break in an if{} statement? Maybe I don't understand the problem though. –  Tyler Rinker Sep 2 '12 at 17:34
    
So you're saying you have some final line in the for loop that is val = <some code here> and you want to stop the loop when val has changed by less than some specified value? –  David Robinson Sep 2 '12 at 17:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Just making an answer out of my comment, I think often repeat will be the best here. It doesn't require you to evaluate the condition at the start and doesn't stop after a finite number of iterations (unless of course that is what you want):

repeat
{
 # Do stuff
 if (condition) break
}
share|improve this answer
    
yes i think this would suit. in terms of writing the condition, the syntax may prove quite tricky as it has converged when the same values are achieved in a row to 4 decimal places. Im a little confused on this –  user1642166 Sep 2 '12 at 18:27
    
store the values from the previous iteration and then compare them to the current iteration. If the absolute value of the difference is less than 1e-4, then they are the same to 4 decimal places. –  Gabor Csardi Sep 2 '12 at 20:40
    
yes im aware of the theory but unsure of the code for comparison as it will be the same notation for both values –  user1642166 Sep 3 '12 at 11:17

If you are just looking for a way of exiting for loops you can just use break.

for (n in 1:1000)
    {
    ...
    if (condition)
       break;
    }
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You could always just use a while loop if you don't know how many iterations it will take. The general form could look something like this:

while(insert_convergence_check_here){
     insert_your_code_here
}

Edit: In response to nico's comment I should add that you could also follow this pattern to essentially create a do/while loop in case you need the loop to run at least once before you can check the convergence criteria.

continue_indicator <- TRUE
while(continue_indicator){
    insert_your_code_here
    continue_indicator <- convergence_check_here
}
share|improve this answer
    
This has two disadvantages: you need to be able to evaluate the condition at the beginning of the loop, which may or may not be possible, depending on the situation and the check is only done at the beginning of the loop, it won't excape mid-loop –  nico Sep 2 '12 at 17:42
    
Yes this looks like what i want. I have a set of 4 values at the end of my code with different labels (A, B, C, D). Within my code there are two separate functions when each calculate different values and feed each other. So when i say convergence, i mean that when function 1 tells function 2 specific values and it calculates new values for A, B, C and D and the cycle continues and the next time these values are the same in as calculated by function 2. –  user1642166 Sep 2 '12 at 17:42
    
Just to clarify my previous comment: there is no situation in which you can do something with a for loop that you cannot do with a while loop. I just think that in general while loops tend to generate messier code (at least in my hands :P). –  nico Sep 2 '12 at 17:50
    
Ìf you can't evaluate the convergence at the start repeat and break seems more appropriate than for or while. –  Sacha Epskamp Sep 2 '12 at 17:52
    
@SachaEpskamp Good points. I think you're right in that if you can't assess convergence from the start then repeat is probably the more readable way to go about it. But it also takes a little bit more code (which I don't necessarily think is a bad thing in all situations if it makes for more readable code). I was just modifying my original answer to address the point nico brought up and I was still in a while loop type of thought process. –  Dason Sep 2 '12 at 18:05

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