Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

Which way is better practice: return a value from a method inside an using statement or declare a variable before, set it inside and return it after?

public int Foo()
{
  using(..)
  {
     return bar;
  }
}

or

public int Foo()
{
  var b = null;
  using(..)
  {
    b = bar;
  }
  return b;
}
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by nawfal, Joce, Rachel Gallen, Iswanto San, A. Rodas Apr 13 '13 at 0:15

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

7 Answers 7

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I prefer the first example. Fewer variables, fewer lines of code, easier to follow, easier to maintain...

public int Foo()
{
  using(..)
  {
     return bar;
  }
}
share|improve this answer

Following the "less is more" principle (really just a variant of KISS), the former. There are fewer lines of code to maintain, no change in semantics and no loss of readability (arguably this style is easier to read).

share|improve this answer

From using Statement - MSDN

The using statement ensures that Dispose is called even if an exception occurs while you are calling methods on the object. You can achieve the same result by putting the object inside a try block and then calling Dispose in a finally block; in fact, this is how the using statement is translated by the compiler.

From the try-finally (C# Reference)

finally is used to guarantee a statement block of code executes regardless of how the preceding try block is exited.

To answer your question, yes its okay to return from a using statement.

share|improve this answer
    
He asked which of the above is better practice, not for the semantics of the using statement. Arguably the semantics are relevant here, but it doesn't answer the question posed. –  Jason Aug 3 '09 at 18:34
    
@Jason: fair enough..the title of the question is "Is it OK to return from a method inside a using statement?" .. you could see i am not the only one who read the question this way. –  Stan R. Aug 3 '09 at 18:36
1  
@Stan R: I see the potential for confusion, but the post clearly is asking about best practices, not whether or not the finally block will execute (i.e., semantics). –  Jason Aug 3 '09 at 18:38

The second is clearly better, and you can verify that it works fine by writing a test program.

The using statement itself can't have a value, which is a limitation. Suppose you have a method called Open that returns an open FileStream, and you want to get the length of the file:

Console.WriteLine(Open().Length);

The bug there is that you aren't disposing the FileStream. So you have to write (similar to your example):

long length;

using (FileStream file = Open())
    length = file.Length;

Console.WriteLine(length);

But with a simple extension method, you can write this instead:

Console.WriteLine(Open().Use(file => file.Length));

Nice and neat, and the FileStream gets properly disposed of.

share|improve this answer
    
Neat, but unreadable at the same time :-) –  Scott P Aug 3 '09 at 18:41
    
heh this is pretty neat. thx for a clever idea. –  Stan R. Aug 3 '09 at 18:41
    
@Scott P - it's essentially the same idea as the ? : operator (an "expression" equivalent to if). Some find ? : less readable than the equivalent if statement, I find it can be clearer sometimes. Eliminating variable names often helps with clarity. –  Daniel Earwicker Aug 3 '09 at 18:45

No reason not to since that using statement translates into a try...finally block and the finally part is guaranteed to be executed (even through a return or an unhandled exception).

share|improve this answer
1  
Someone always has to point this out - the finally block is not "guaranteed" to be executed at all. There are well-defined circumstances under which it will execute, and others where it won't. –  Daniel Earwicker Aug 3 '09 at 18:30
1  
Have some examples where it won't? –  Jordan Parmer Aug 3 '09 at 18:31
1  
@Earwicker: if the cases where it won't get executed amount to < 0.01%, then I think for most purposes, we can say it's "guaranteed". –  John Saunders Aug 3 '09 at 18:31
1  
That was @Earwicker btw :) –  Blindy Aug 3 '09 at 18:33
1  
It's guaranteed to run in the same sense any other code is guaranteed to run. –  Joel Coehoorn Aug 3 '09 at 18:33

It really comes down to personal preference. You'll find arguments on both sides of this particular fence. Myself, I favor option 1: returning as soon as you can. I believe it expresses the intent of the code better; there's no reason to stick around longer than you have to. If you've completed all your work, return.

Sometimes, you'll have multiple possible return points, and "end-of-method" work (logging, cleanup) that might lead you to a single return statement. Nothing terrible about that, but you can often handle those situations in finally blocks or with aspects in aspect-oriented programming.

share|improve this answer
1  
I agree about the personal preference. I prefer to do returning at the bottom/end of the method. Coding guidelines often dictate this as well. This probably also comes from the fact that methods are sometimes way too long, which results in unreadable methods. Keep them really short and your methods are readable again. So this is one of those "it depends" answers I guess! ;) Looking at them from best practices, afaik there really isn't one, it's more a matter of preference. –  Dennis van der Stelt Aug 3 '09 at 18:55

I feel second one better

public int Foo()
{
  using(..)
  {
     return bar;
  }
}

One thing that arises in mind while using this way is that we are returning in between the using so will the object(that we have wrapped in using ) will get disposed ,the Answer is yes because A using statement is just the mixture of try/finally block, it's fine to return from a try block too.The return expression will be evaluated, then the finally block will be executed, and the the method will return then.So go Ahead:)

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.