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So I am using default constructor to insert individual entries into memory and then read them by calling getBookInfo() method. When I try just to do a test run with only one variable I am not getting anything there even if I am calling getBookInfo() after I inserted the data.

Why is that?

Main.cpp

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

#include "Book.h"

void main()
{
    Book book;

    book.setTitle("Advanced C++ Programming");
    book.setAuthorName("Linda", "Smith");
    book.setPublisher("Microsoft Press", "One Microsoft Way", "Redmond");
    book.setPrice(49.99);
    book.getBookInfo(); // <-= this should be output

    int i;
    cin >> i;
};

Book.cpp

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
using namespace std;

#include "Book.h"

Book::Book()
{
}

void Book::setTitle(string  title)
{
    title = title;
}


void Book::setPrice(double price)
{
    price = price;
}

string Book::convertDoubleToString(double number)
{
    return static_cast<ostringstream*>( &(ostringstream() << number) ) -> str();
}

// this should be output
string Book::getBookInfo()
{
    stringstream ss;
    ss << title << endl << convertDoubleToString(price) << endl;

    return ss.str();
}
share|improve this question
1  
why are you using same variables names? –  Coding Mash Sep 2 '12 at 19:31
    
Hint: don't use the same name for member variables and function parameters. –  Paul R Sep 2 '12 at 19:31
2  
I also don't see any output operations in your code. –  jrok Sep 2 '12 at 19:32
1  
I know, and my point still stands :) See Tod's answer. –  jrok Sep 2 '12 at 19:37
1  
If you don't want to change the names, use the this-pointer in your constructor/setters like so: this->price = price; –  chessweb Sep 2 '12 at 19:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to capture the data returned from getBootInfo(), for example

string result = book.GetBookInfo();
cout << result;
share|improve this answer

Change

void Book::setTitle(string  title)
{
    title = title;
}

to

void Book::setTitle(string  title)
{
    this->title = title;
}

and the same change wherever this kind of code occurs. As written, the code assigns the value of the argument title to the argument title, i.e. it does nothing. The compiler probably warned you about this.

Or, as @hmjd said, change the names of the arguments.

share|improve this answer
    
There was no warnings and I tried adding this-> and still no output. :( –  HelpNeeder Sep 2 '12 at 19:35
    
Well, no output is a different matter. Where does the program do any output? <g> –  Pete Becker Sep 2 '12 at 19:36
    
As for clarification reasons... By saying arguments you mean the variables? –  HelpNeeder Sep 2 '12 at 19:37
    
By "arguments" I mean the names used for the arguments to the function: in void Book::setTitle(string title), title is the name of an argument of type string. The members of the class are "data members". –  Pete Becker Sep 2 '12 at 19:38
    
+1 For "change the names of the arguments." –  Thomas Matthews Sep 2 '12 at 19:40

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