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I have written a code that reads from a file named network.dat

The code I wrote is

    f = fopen("network.dat", "r");
    if(f == NULL)
        exit(1);
    int read, N;

    printf("%p\n", f);//output file pointer, included this just to check if file is opened properly
    fscanf(f, "%d%d", &N, &read);//error here
    cout<<N; 

The file is being opened correctly and am getting the file pointer (49897488) as output but the line following it is where program stops working and I don't get N as output. Please tell if other detail is required. Contents of network.dat are

10 1
1   6   1.28646
1   7   1.2585
2   9   1.33856

and so on. Am just focusing on first 2 numbers from the file i.e. 10 and 1.

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1  
What is the variable N? –  hmjd Sep 2 '12 at 19:39
    
How did you declare N? –  piokuc Sep 2 '12 at 19:40
    
BTW, you should be using %p to print f, not %d. –  hmjd Sep 2 '12 at 19:43
    
@all, I have corrected the snippet as you all wished. There is a N now. But that was not the problem. –  Srijan Sep 2 '12 at 19:47
    
@Srijan, what was the problem? –  hmjd Sep 2 '12 at 19:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

As I stated in my comment, the problem is that your format specifier is incorrect. Try

fscanf(f, "%d%d", &N, &read);

Since you're using cout I'm fathoming a guess that this is actually C++ code... honestly, you should really not be doing this the canonical C way. Instead, use ifstream.

std::ifstream input("network.dat");
int N, read;
input >> N >> read;
std::cout << N << ' ' << read << std::endl;
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That was a typo, i have corrected it. Thanks for pointing it out. –  Srijan Sep 2 '12 at 20:01
    
@Srijan can you tell us what the "error" is? What problems are you having? Can you post an SSCCE? –  oldrinb Sep 2 '12 at 20:05
    
@Srijan I highly suggest you use the C++ alternative. –  oldrinb Sep 2 '12 at 20:22

Your scanf() format string is incorrect. "%d,%d" looks for two integers separated by a comma. If you want to read two integers separated by whitespace, just do "%d%d".

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That was a typo, i have corrected it. Thanks for pointing it out. –  Srijan Sep 2 '12 at 20:01
    
If you find that any of the scanf() functions aren't giving what you expect, first check that the format string is correct, then check that you are passing pointers (which you were here). –  teppic Sep 2 '12 at 20:04

This seems to work Srijan. The code is a quick and dirty cut and paste job, zero points for style, but it does the job as a test. It seems that the number of fields in the records needs to match the fields in the print format string. I added a 3rd field in your test data on record 1 of 1.9999 and it worked. I doubt this is a technically pure explanation.

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <cstring>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
using std::cout;
using std::endl;
using std::cin;
using std::ios;

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
//int read;
//int N;
int res;
FILE *f;


f = fopen("network.dat", "r");
    if(f == NULL)
        exit(1);
    int read, N;
    float f3;

    printf("%p\n", f);//output file pointer, included this just to check if file is opened properly
    for (;;)
        {
    res = fscanf(f, "%d%d%f", &N, &read, &f3);//error here
    if (res <= 0)
        {
        printf("err %d\n",errno);
        break;
        }
    cout<<N << " " << read << "\n";
        }
}
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You code expects all the characters in the file up until the first whitespace to be an int. If the file doesn't begin with an int, that could be the reason it's failing.

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