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I have the following structure:

<body>
    <div id="main-wrapper">
        <header>
        </header>
        <nav>
        </nav>
        <article>
        </article>
        <footer>
        </footer>
    </div>
</body>

I dynamically load content in the <article> using javascript. Because of this, the height of the <article> block can change.

I want the <footer> block to be at the bottom of the page when there is a lot of content, or at the bottom of the browser window when only a few lines of content exist.

At the moment I can do one or the other... but not both.

So does anyone know how I can do this - get the <footer> to stick to the bottom of the page/content or the bottom of the screen, depending on which is lower.

share|improve this question
    
Would people care to comment on why they down-voted a 2 year old question? –  Will 2 days ago

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Ryan Fait's sticky footer is very nice, however I find its basic structure to be lacking*.

My base structure of choice is:

<div id="page">
  <div id="page-inner">
    <header id="header">
      <div id="header-inner">
      </div>
    </header><!--/#header-->
    <nav id="nav">
      <div id="nav-inner">
      </div>
    </nav><!--/#nav-->
    <div id="wrapper">
      <div id="wrapper-inner">
        <div id="content">
          <div id="content-inner">
          </div>
        </div><!--/#content-->
        <div id="sidebar">
          <div id="sidebar-inner">
          </div>
        </div><!--/#sidebar-->
      </div>
    </div><!--/#wrapper-->
    <footer id="footer">
      <div id="footer-inner">
      </div>
    </footer><!--/#footer-->
  </div>
</div><!--/#page-->

Which isn't all that far off from:

<div id="main-wrapper">
    <header>
    </header>
    <nav>
    </nav>
    <article>
    </article>
    <footer>
    </footer>
</div>

The trick to getting the footer to stick is to have the footer anchored to the bottom padding of its containing element. This requires that the height of the footer is static, but I've found that footers are typically of static height.

HTML:
<div id="main-wrapper">
    ...
    <footer>
    </footer>
</div>
CSS:
#main-wrapper {
    padding: 0 0 100px;
    position: relative;
}

footer {
    bottom: 0;
    height: 100px;
    left: 0;
    position: absolute;
    width: 100%;
}

Example 1

With the footer anchored to #main-wrapper, you now need #main-wrapper to be at least the height of the page, unless its children are longer. This is done by making #main-wrapper have a min-height of 100%. You also have to remember that its parents, html and body need to be as tall as the page as well.

CSS:
html,
body {
    height: 100%;
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
}

#main-wrapper {
    min-height: 100%;
    padding: 0 0 100px;
    position: relative;
}

footer {
    bottom: 0;
    height: 100px;
    left: 0;
    position: absolute;
    width: 100%;
}

Example 2

Of course, you should be questioning my judgement, as this code is forcing the footer fall off the bottom of the page, even when there's no content. The last trick is to change the box model used by the #main-wrapper so that the min-height of 100% includes the 100px padding.

CSS:
html,
body {
    height: 100%;
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
}

#main-wrapper {
    box-sizing: border-box;
    min-height: 100%;
    padding: 0 0 100px;
    position: relative;
}

footer {
    bottom: 0;
    height: 100px;
    left: 0;
    position: absolute;
    width: 100%;
}

Example 3

And there you have it, a sticky footer with your original HTML structure. Just make sure that the footer's height is equal to #main-wrapper's padding-bottom, and you should be set.


Flexbox Version

If you're fortunate enough that you can use flexbox without needing to support older browsers, sticky footers become trivially easy, and support a dynamically sized footer.

The trick to getting footers to stick to the bottom with flexbox is to have other elements in the same container flex vertically. All it takes is a full-height wrapper element with display: flex and at least one sibling with a flex value greater than 0:

CSS:
html,
body {
  height: 100%;
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
}

#main-wrapper {
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: column;
  min-height: 100%;
}

article {
  flex: 1;
}

Example 4


* The reason I find fault with Fait's structure is because it sets the .footer and .header elements on different hierarchical levels while adding an unnecessary .push element.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for providing a solution that worked with the OPs original html. However, you make a claim that Fait's basic structure is lacking, and yet provide no reasons why. Also as a note, his basic structure is just that basic. It is just simple enough to allow new web designers to adapt it to any scenario they may need. That being said, I like your solution. Thank you for teaching me something new. –  Josh Mein Sep 3 '12 at 20:08
    
@JoshMein, I didn't feel it was worth elaborating on what boils down to my personal opinion on Fait's sticky footer structure at the time. His post is what led me to my own version of the sticky footer, which is slightly different from this answer, so I certainly feel that it's deserving of praise. The reason I find fault with Fait's structure is because it sets the .footer and .header elements on different hierarchical levels while adding an unnecessary .push element. –  zzzzBov Sep 4 '12 at 3:37

Ryan Fait's sticky footer is a simple solution that I have used several times in the past.

Basic HTML:

<div class="wrapper">
    <div class="header">
        <h1>CSS Sticky Footer</h1>
    </div>
    <div class="content"></div>
    <div class="push"></div>
</div>
<div class="footer"></div>

CSS:

* {
    margin: 0;
}
html, body {
    height: 100%;
}
.wrapper {
    min-height: 100%;
    height: auto !important;
    height: 100%;
    margin: 0 auto -142px; /* the bottom margin is the negative value of the footer's height */
}
.footer, .push {
    height: 142px; /* .push must be the same height as .footer */
}

/*

Sticky Footer by Ryan Fait
http://ryanfait.com/

*/

Translating this to be similar to what you already have results with something along these lines:

HTML:

<body>
    <div class="wrapper">
        <header>
        </header>
        <nav>
        </nav>
        <article>
        </article>
        <div class="push"></div>
    </div>
    <footer>
    </footer>
</body>

CSS:

* {
    margin: 0;
}
html, body {
    height: 100%;
}
.wrapper {
    min-height: 100%;
    height: auto !important;
    height: 100%;
    margin: 0 auto -142px; /* the bottom margin is the negative value of the footer's height */
}
footer, .push {
    height: 142px; /* .push must be the same height as .footer */
}

Just dont forget to update the negative on the wrapper margin to match the height of your footer and push div. Good luck!

share|improve this answer
1  
I love the way he put the comment at the bottom, appropriate for a footer solution :D –  Second Rikudo Sep 2 '12 at 19:51
    
There's no need to change the markup for this particular style. –  zzzzBov Sep 2 '12 at 20:38
    
@zzzzBov I do not have much time to look into this further right now, but what exactly do you mean? –  Josh Mein Sep 2 '12 at 20:44
    
I'm on my mobile ATM so I can't write a full answer otherwise I'd have done that already. The comment was more so I'd remember to add an answer later. –  zzzzBov Sep 2 '12 at 21:09
    
@JoshMein, I've added an answer that explains how to make the footer stick without messing with the provided structure. –  zzzzBov Sep 3 '12 at 19:50

use css and do a margin shift downwards and it should be fine..

or separate the footer from the main body. use another div for it?

share|improve this answer

Here (Make the Footer Stick to the Bottom of a Page) is great post/tutorial to solve your problem...try it.

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