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This is my code:

/*
create an abstract class shape and derived classes rectangle and circle from class shape, implement abstract method of class shape in rectangle and circle. Class circle contains radius as data members rectangle class contains length and breadth.
 */

class shape
{

              virtual void displayArea() = 0;
              virtual void get_radius(double r) = 0;
              virtual void get_length(double a) = 0;
              virtual void get_breadth(double b) = 0;
};

class rectangle: public shape
{

      protected:

                double length;
                double breadth;
      public:
             virtual void get_length(double a)
             {
                     length = a;
             }
             virtual void get_breadth(double b)
             {
                     breadth = b;
             }
             virtual void get_radius(double r)
             {
                     cout << endl;
             }
             virtual void displayArea()
             {
                     cout << "Area of RECTANGLE = " << length*breadth << endl;
             }
};

class circle: public shape
{

      protected:
                double radius;
      public:
              virtual void get_length(double a)
             {
                     cout << endl;
             }
             virtual void get_breadth(double b)
             {
                     cout << endl;
             }
             virtual void get_radius(double r)
             {
                     radius = r;
             }
             virtual void displayArea()
             {
                     cout << "Area of circle = " << 3.14*radius*radius << endl;
             }
};

int main()
{

    shape* shapes;
    double l, r, b;
    rectangle R;
    circle C;

    cout << "Enter the length and breadth for rectangle\n" << endl;
    cin >> l >> b; 
    cout << "\nEnter the radius of circle\n " << endl;
    cin >> r;
    R.get_length(l);
    R.get_breadth(b);
    C.get_radius(r);

    shapes[0] = R;
    shapes[1] = C;

    shapes[0].displayArea();
    shapes[1].displayArea();

    system("pause");
    return 0;
}

It is giving no compilation errors but during runtime this happens: Enter the length and breadth for rectangle

3 3

Enter the radius of circle

3

Then it pauses for sometime and then terminates. I am confused, what have I done wrong here and how to correct it? And what issues are there with the code?

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4 Answers 4

Your shapes variable is uninitialized (which I suppose it to be array) , you need to initialize it with the address of objects :

shape* shapes[2] ;
//...

shapes[0] = &R;
shapes[1] = &C;

shapes[0]->displayArea();
shapes[1]->displayArea();
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For a start you have no constructors or setter functions (at least you have not shown any code for them) so there is no way to set your class member variables.

Secondly you cant do this

shape* shapes;
shapes[0] = R;
shapes[1] = C;

as shapes is a pointer for which you have not allocated memory. If you want an array of shape pointers you must declare shapes as an array and if it is an array of pointers, you should assign pointers to its elements and not objects.

EDIT I see that in fact you do have setter functions, and that you have called them get_length() get_radius() etc. This is highly confusing and you would be better using variable names that indicate what they do where possible. To someone reading your code this is very confusing

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The line

shape* shapes;

declares a pointer to a shape object. However, you have not allocated any memory for any shapes. Then you later use this pointer as an array:

shapes[0] = R; 
shapes[1] = C; 

This causes undefined behavior since this memory location is not allocated for use by your program.

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One thing that I noticed about your code is that 'shapes' is not actually an array. It is a non-initialized pointer. So shapes[0]=R will not point member#0 to R, it will copy it to wherever the pointer points to. The next line will do something similar. This will probably cause memory corruption. You probably want something like

shape* Shapes[2];

Or even (moving this line to after the place C and R are declared):

shape** Shapes = {
    &R,
    &C
};
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